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Abstract

This report presents the results of EcoAdapt’s efforts to survey adaptation action in marine fisheries management by examining the major climate impacts on marine and coastal fisheries in the United States, assessing related challenges to fisheries management, and presenting examples of actions taken to decrease vulnerability and/or increase resilience. First, we provide a summary of climate change impacts and secondary effects on fisheries, focusing on changes in air and water temperatures, precipitation patterns, storms, ocean circulation, sea level rise, and water chemistry.

Location

United States
48° 54' 11.6856" N, 84° 48' 52.0308" W
US

Project Summary

This integrated research project, which ran from 2007-2008, was initiated to better understand the implications of projected climate change impacts and adaptation responses on southern Ontario’s fish, fisheries, and water resources. Climate change will have predominantly negative effects on species and habitats, and resulting economic effects are expected to be devastating to the region. In addition, changes in temperature and precipitation patterns will require alterations to water resources planning and management.

Abstract

The purpose of the 2016 Berkley Workshop was to explore some of the ways that land conservation groups might best respond to our changing climate, with particular emphasis on the science and finance guiding and enabling the stewardship of natural areas.

Among the major themes were the following:

Abstract

Adapting to climate change in the Sagadahoc region will be a multifaceted endeavor with planning and implementation required at both the local and regional scales. At the regional scale, a shared vision of a resilient landscape will be essential to informing local planning and development decisions.

Location

Alameda County, California CA
United States
37° 45' 53.9892" N, 122° 13' 20.9532" W
California US
Organization: 
Four Twenty Seven
Organization: 

Project Summary

Cities across the United States face the challenge of integrating climate change considerations into their planning. Climate data is complex and fragmented, and often presented in a format and scale that are not aligned with planners’ needs. To support the integration of climate change adaptation into relevant plans such as local hazard mitigation plans, Four Twenty Seven, a California-based climate risk consulting firm, worked with the Alameda County waste authority to develop:

Abstract

CCVA - Part 2 focuses on the risks from sea level rise and storm surges.  The summary report and two technical reports describe the methods and results from applying the Boston Harbor Flood Risk Model, which is based on the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model, in a vulnerability assessment of key assets and populations in Cambridge, MA.  The Part 2 report complements the Part 1 report, which focuses on the risks from increasing temperatures and precipitation.  The two CCVA Reports form the technical foundation for the Cambridge Climate Change Preparedness & Resilience Plan that is being

Abstract

The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife and the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment jointly developed a climate-change vulnerability assessment for priority wildlife and plant species and habitats on the Navajo landscape. The priority species and habitats included in this analysis were identified by the entire staff of NNDFW through a structured planning process.

Location

United States
51° 28' 31.4256" N, 127° 58' 7.5" W
US

Project Summary

The Marine Plan Partnership for the North Pacific Coast (MaPP) is a collaboration between British Columbia’s Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, and First Nations representing the Coastal First Nations-Great Bear Initiative, the North Coast-Skeena First Nations Stewardship Society, and the Nanwakolas Council. EcoAdapt partnered with MaPP in 2012-2015 to facilitate the integration of climate change into marine use plans for the four subregions: Haida Gwaii, North Coast, Central Coast, and North Vancouver Island.

Location

United States
42° 18' 6.2856" N, 70° 54' 23.2128" W
US
Organization: 

Project Summary

In 2013, the Town of Hull passed a zoning by-law creating a Nantasket Beach Overlay District to create a sustainable shoreline that allows for mixed-use development while protecting natural resources and coastal communities. The zoning by-law establishes the Planning Board as a Special Permit Granting Authority for the overlay district.

Location

United States
44° 8' 2.1408" N, 68° 23' 43.386" W
US

Project Summary

Maine’s Coastal Sand Dune Rules recognize uncertainty around rates of erosion and sea level rise, but also the need to act despite uncertainty. The rules define erosion hazard areas as any section of the coastal dune system that may become part of a coastal wetland over the next 100 years due to cumulative changes resulting from (1) historic long-term erosion, (2) short-term erosion from a 100-year storm, or (3) flooding during a 100-year storm combined with a two-foot rise in sea level.

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