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Location

United States
47° 58' 32.8404" N, 124° 39' 57.546" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Dave Conca
Organization: 

Project Summary

Archeological sites and traditional resources of significance to indigenous groups along the Olympic Coast are being affected by climate change. The goals of this project can be split into three facets. The first is for the park to foster communication, data sharing, and cooperation between the eight federally listed tribes on the Olympic Peninsula and the National Park Service (NPS) to ensure proper alignment of resources and priorities for climate change adaptation.

Location

TX
United States
31° 58' 6.9564" N, 99° 54' 6.5268" W
Texas US
Author Name(s): 
Jack G. Johnson, Brenda K. Todd

Project Summary

Amistad National Recreation Area, Texas, protects many archeological sites in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands region of southwest Texas. Sites are affected by lake level fluctuations related to climate change impacts including precipitation, storms, and changes in agricultural water use. Park managers are documenting the impact of changing water levels on the cultural resources in the park. 

Location

210 New York Avenue
10305 Staten Island , NY
United States
40° 36' 12.9312" N, 74° 3' 31.7124" W
New York US
Organization Overview: 

There are three geographic units: Sandy Hook, New Jersey; Jamaica Bay and Staten Island, New York City. The NYC units include Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Fort Tilden, Riis Park in Queens, Floyd Bennett Field and Canarsie Pier in Brooklyn. Staten Island has Great Kills Park, Miller Field and Fort Wadsworth. These sites and others make up the 27,000 acres of Gateway, one national park. 

Abstract

The Peconic Estuary Program is using EPA’s publication, “Being Prepared for Climate Change: A Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans” to create a risk-based climate change vulnerability assessment. This video describes some climate change impacts that are already affecting eastern Long Island. Local people explain why they are conducting the assessment and describe some of the ways they are starting to respond to climate change risks.

Abstract

This report is designed to serve as a reference for individuals interested in understanding the state of the science on climate change and its effects within the Puget Sound region. We define the Puget Sound region to include the water bodies of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, as well as any United States land areas that ultimately drain into these waters.

Location

MT
United States
47° 5' 2.6376" N, 111° 39' 30.7728" W
Montana US

Project Summary

The Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership (TRCP) is an organization dedicated to land stewardship, expanding habitat and increasing public access to quality hunting and fishing. In 2007, Bill Geer of the TRCP piloted the Sportsmen's Values Mapping Project in Montana, which captures sportsmen’s input to delineate highly valued hunting and fishing areas.

Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas

Tool Overview: 

The Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas (Aqueduct) is a publicly available, global database and interactive tool that maps indicators of water-related risks. Aqueduct enables comparison across large geographies to identify regions or assets deserving of closer attention.

BETA LAUNCH: Projected Change Indicators, 2020, 2030, 2040

Abstract

This webinar discusses the recent report, Integrating Climate Change into Northeast and Midwest State Wildlife Action Plans, a tool to assist in the revision of 10-year state plans. The purpose of this NE CSC-led cooperative project is to provide a synthesis of what is known and what is uncertain about climate change and its impacts across the NE CSC region, with a particular focus on the responses and vulnerabilities of Regional Species of Greatest

Location

Connecicut
55 Church Street
06510 New Haven , CT
United States
41° 18' 17.4168" N, 72° 55' 34.1868" W
Connecticut US
Organization: 

Project Summary

The Salt Marsh Advancement Zone Assessment for Connecticut report is the culmination of a statewide study of each of the 24 coastal municipalities in Connecticut. At the municipal scale, these 24 individual reports inform communities about future marsh advancement locations, current land use of those affected properties, and which parcels are critical to the persistence of the community’s salt marshes.

Abstract

It is increasingly apparent that the global climate is rapidly changing and that these changes will affect the people, ecosystems, economy, and culture of the North Olympic Peninsula. The most noticeable impacts will likely include:

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