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Abstract

PlaNYC is New York City's climate change strategy. All of PlaNYC's strategies - from reducing the number of cars to building cleaner, more efficient power plants to addressing inefficiencies in buildings - will contribute to their long term emissions reductions target. In addition, it outlines a plan to embark on a long term planning effort to develop a climate change adaptation strategy, to prepare New York City for the climate shifts that are already unavoidable.

Abstract

On February 2, 2005, Governor Janet Napolitano signed Executive Order 2005-02 establishing the Climate Change Advisory Group (CCAG). Appointed by the Governor, the 35-member CCAG comprised a diverse group of stakeholders who brought broad perspective and expertise to the topic of climate change in Arizona.

Abstract

The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)model was used to assess the effects of potential future climate change on the hydrology of the Upper Mississippi River Basin(UMRB). Calibration and validation of SWAT were performed using monthly stream flows for 1968-1987 and 1988-1997,respectively. The R2 and Nash-Sutcliffe simulation efficiency values computed for the monthly comparisons were 0.74 and 0.69 for the calibration period and 0.82 and 0.81 for the validation period.

Abstract

This report is intended for elected municipal officials and senior staff. It outlines decision-making processes to adapt to climate change and showcases municipal adaptation measures implemented across the country. The goal is to help municipal governments make informed decisions and take appropriate action. For those municipalities that are already developing adaptation measures, this document can help enhance an understanding of climate change adaptation among elected officials, staff and the broader community.

Abstract

Environmental and societal factors such as air quality, water quality and availability, land use changes and expanding urbanization are already affecting human health and welfare, agriculture, and natural ecosystems in the Midwestern United States. Over this century, these existing stresses will likely be exacerbated by climate changes resulting from human activities. It is essential that policy decisions aimed at preserving the well-being of a region be informed by a good understanding of the region’s climate, how climate might change, and the uncertainties inherent in future projections.

Abstract

From the Introduction:Climate provides fundamental limits on and opportunities for human activities and ecosystem functioning within the Great Lakes region. A changing climate could lead to alterations in the frequency and severity of droughts and floods; water supply; air, soil, and water quality; ecosystem health; human health; and resource use and the economy. Climate change may act through multiple pathways; interactions in and impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem can be dynamic and non-linear.

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