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Abstract

EPA is working with many other organizations to collect and communicate data about climate change. With help from these partners, EPA has compiled the third edition of this report, presenting 30 indicators to help readers understand observed long-term trends related to the causes and effects of climate change. In a manner accessible to all audiences, the report describes the significance of these trends and their possible consequences for people, the environment, and society.

Abstract

The report draws from a series of workshops with leading federal, state and local officials and builds upon lessons learned post-disaster in New Orleans (following Hurricane Katrina), New York (following Hurricane Sandy) and Vermont (after Hurricane Irene). The report identifies more than 30 federal programs, initiatives and laws that can be used to prepare for extreme events such as storms, floods and heat waves as well as rising seas.

Abstract

This report describes the results of an initial study to advance policies and practices in British Columbia, and elsewhere, with regard to the use of “soft” shore armouring alternatives within the context of climate change, sea level rise (SLR) practices and guidelines and flood protection. The study was initiated by the Stewardship Centre for British Columbia, with the support of Natural Resources Canada.

Abstract

Forests in northern Minnesota will be affected directly and indirectly by a changing climate over the next 100 years. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of forest ecosystems in Minnesota's Laurentian Mixed Forest Province to a range of future climates. Information on current forest conditions, observed climate trends, projected climate changes, and impacts to forest ecosystems was considered in order to draw conclusions on climate change vulnerability.

Abstract

The Climate Change in Colorado report is a synthesis of climate science relevant for management and planning for Colorado’s water resources. It focuses on observed climate trends, climate modeling, and projections of temperature, precipitation, snowpack, and streamflow. The 2014 report is a thorough revision and expansion of the 2008 report of the same name, also produced by WWA in partnership with the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB).

Abstract

This report is the second in The Boston Harbor Association (TBHA)’s Preparing for the Rising Tide series. TBHA both times partnered with recognized content experts—in this case Sasaki Associates—to offer policy recommendations to help Boston prepare for increased coastal flooding. 

Preparing for the Rising Tide (2013) provided an initial assessment of Boston’s vulnerability to coastal flooding due to storm surges and sea level rise.  The report also described how to do a basic site-specific vulnerability assessment and a time-phased preparedness plan. 

Abstract

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has produced the most comprehensive assessment of climate change ever. The Fifth Assessment Report, which the IPCC is releasing in four parts between September 2013 and November 2014, is the work of 830 expert authors, from 85 countries. Its first three volumes already stretch to 5,000+ pages.

Abstract

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has produced the most comprehensive assessment of climate change ever. The Fifth Assessment Report, which the IPCC is releasing in four parts between September 2013 and November 2014, is the work of 830 expert authors, from 85 countries.

Abstract

The publication, Considering Multiple Futures: Scenario Planning to Address Uncertainty in Natural Resource Conservation, presents scenario planning as an approach to help natural resource managers accommodate the uncertainty involved with combined threats to habitats and wildlife, including climate change, habitat fragmentation, land use, and invasive species.

Abstract

Most scientists now agree that climate change, i.e., global warming, is occurring at a rate much faster than the normal climatic cycles, due to anthropogenic causes of greenhouse gases. Because global warming is changing the ocean currents and wind patterns, climate is changing world-wide. Some of these changes are beneficial, such as a longer growing season for farmers; however, most are harmful.

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