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Abstract

This report presents the results of EcoAdapt’s efforts to survey adaptation action in marine fisheries management by examining the major climate impacts on marine and coastal fisheries in the United States, assessing related challenges to fisheries management, and presenting examples of actions taken to decrease vulnerability and/or increase resilience. First, we provide a summary of climate change impacts and secondary effects on fisheries, focusing on changes in air and water temperatures, precipitation patterns, storms, ocean circulation, sea level rise, and water chemistry.

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The urban forest of the Chicago Wilderness region, a 7-million-acre area covering portions of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin, will face direct and indirect impacts from a changing climate over the 21st century. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of urban trees and natural and developed landscapes within the Chicago Wilderness region to a range of future climates. We synthesized and summarized information on the contemporary landscape, provided information on past climate trends, and illustrated a range of projected future climates.

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This national briefing paper examines the interconnections between water management and vulnerable communities in the United States. Too often, when we think of vulnerable communities that struggle with water-related challenges, we think of places like sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, and other developing regions. The overall high quality of water systems in America—one of our most monumental achievements as a nation—obscures the fact that water challenges are a daily reality for some communities.

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During June of 2014, the town of Bowdoinham, Maine approved a new Comprehensive Plan for the coming years. As part of this plan, they included a section on adapting to sea-level rise and more severe rainstorms caused by climate change. By looking at past sea-level rise in the region and IPCC reports, the town developed projections for how much sea-level would rise nearby. Bowdoinham estimates sea-level in the area will rise at least one foot by 2050 and two feet by 2100, although they mention these estimates may be conservative.

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Learn how Community-Driven Climate Resilience Planning is a vital opportunity for cities to reorganize resources, foster meaningful relationships, and develop placed-based innovations that support all people to thrive despite climate disruption.

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This document, Safeguarding California Plan: 2017 Update, is a programmatic survey across state government of what California is doing to respond to climate change, what needs to be done, and how we will achieve those goals. The hundreds of actions and recommendations listed here were developed through the scientific and policy expertise of staff from 27 state agencies. The plan opens with overarching strategies recommended by the California Natural Resources Agency, the State’s lead agency on climate change adaptation.

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A new CDKN working paper by Andrew Scott of ODI explores the effectiveness of governing for the “water-energy-food nexus” of issues. The author looks at approaches that understand the links between sectors, recognise these in decision-making and promote integrated policy-making.

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The Earth’s climate is changing – wetter winters and drier summers will affect existing buildings and alter the requirements of new ones. Whatever the cause of climate change, we will need to adapt our buildings so that they can cope with higher temperatures, more extreme weather and changes in rainfall.

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Several of New Jersey’s neighboring Mid-Atlantic States have recently proposed legislative and administrative changes to agency programs in order to account for risks posed to state resources and residents by a changing climate. Coastal managers in Maryland, Delaware, and New York identified recent legislation, executive actions and proposals as the latest efforts to incorporate climate change into law in their respective states to address coastal resources and risks, including:

Abstract

Severe weather, coupled with an aging and overstressed electrical infrastructure, is having a dramatic impact on the U.S. population. In late 2012, Superstorm Sandy’s devastation left 132 people dead; more than 8 million people in 16 states lost power; subway tunnels were inundated with water; 305,000 homes in New York City and 72,000 homes and businesses in New Jersey were damaged or destroyed; sewage plants were crippled, causing hundreds of millions of gallons of sewage to ow into waterways; and four New York City hospitals shut their doors.

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