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Abstract

Rural Arctic communities are vulnerable to climate change and residents seek adaptive strategies that will protect health and health infrastructure. In the Inupiat community of Noatak, climate change is impacting the weather, land, river, wildlife, plants, and the lives of the people who live there.

Abstract

Climate change refers to change over time due to natural variability or as a result of human activity (IPCC, 2008). Alaska is experiencing a wide range of impacts from climate change and communities seek adaptive strategies that encourage wellness and sustainability. This report documents climate change impacts as described by local people and climate change effects or potential effects as interpreted through the lens of public health.

Abstract

Climate change refers to change over time due to natural variability or as a result of human activity (IPCC, 2008). Today the term is mostly used to describe global changes caused by the burning of fossil fuels and the warming effect caused by the transfer of enormous quantities of carbon dioxide from the earth to the air. But climate change also has local implications and communities seek adaptive strategies that encourage wellness and sustainability. The North Slope of Alaska is characterized by permafrost and ice.

Abstract

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 and EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) and Office of Water (OW) have launched a pilot research project to consider how projected climate change impacts could be incorporated into a total maximum daily load (TMDL) program and influence restoration plans. The pilot research project will use a temperature TMDL being developed for the South Fork Nooksack River (SFNR), in Washington, as the pilot TMDL for a climate change analysis.

Abstract

Climate change refers to change over time due to natural variability or as a result of human activity (IPCC, 2008). Alaska communities are experiencing a wide range of impacts from climate change and residents seek adaptive strategies that encourage wellness and sustainability. This report documents climate change impacts and potential impacts as described by the local people and interpreted through the lens of public health. It is the sixth report in a series describing climate change across Alaska, and the rst report to focus on the Bristol Bay Region.

Abstract

On a narrow promontory extending far out into the Chukchi Sea, the village of Point Hope enjoys one of the nest locations in Alaska for the harvest of subsistence resources, including sh, marine mammals, birds and caribou. This amazing place has allowed the Inupiat of Point Hope to ourish for centuries, and it is one of the oldest continuously occupied communities in Alaska. But it is also one of the most exposed, vulnerable to the full force of coastal storms and the constant shaping of the land by the wind and the sea.

Abstract

The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe initiated a pilot study to assess the impacts of anticipated climate changes to both tribal infrastructure and the Sauk river ecosystem that supports fish and wildlife critical to the tribe. The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe’s homeland encompasses a broad area including the Sauk and Cascade River watersheds in northwestern Washington. The Sauk River is a large meandering alluvial river that flows north into the Skagit River. Sauk River Miles (RM) start at its confluence with the Skagit.

Abstract

Rural Arctic communities are vulnerable to climate change and residents seek adaptive strategies that will protect public health. In the Inupiat community of Selawik, climate change is impacting the weather, land, river, wildlife, plants, and the lives of the people who live there. This report identi es health concerns related to food and water security, and community infrastructure including water and sanitation.

Abstract

This climate change health assessment project was initiated in 2013 by the North Slope Borough, Health Impact Assessment (HIA) program with a grant from the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska. The project is in collaboration with the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC), Center for Climate and Health, and participating local governments. ANTHC performed an assessment in 2009 in Point Hope with funding from the U.S. Indian Health Service.

Abstract

This trip report documents climate change impacts as described by the community members and considers the effects as interpreted through the lens of public health.

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