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Abstract

The Climate Change in Colorado report is a synthesis of climate science relevant for management and planning for Colorado’s water resources. It focuses on observed climate trends, climate modeling, and projections of temperature, precipitation, snowpack, and streamflow. The 2014 report is a thorough revision and expansion of the 2008 report of the same name, also produced by WWA in partnership with the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB).

Abstract

This report is the second in The Boston Harbor Association (TBHA)’s Preparing for the Rising Tide series. TBHA both times partnered with recognized content experts—in this case Sasaki Associates—to offer policy recommendations to help Boston prepare for increased coastal flooding. 

Preparing for the Rising Tide (2013) provided an initial assessment of Boston’s vulnerability to coastal flooding due to storm surges and sea level rise.  The report also described how to do a basic site-specific vulnerability assessment and a time-phased preparedness plan. 

Abstract

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has produced the most comprehensive assessment of climate change ever. The Fifth Assessment Report, which the IPCC is releasing in four parts between September 2013 and November 2014, is the work of 830 expert authors, from 85 countries. Its first three volumes already stretch to 5,000+ pages.

Abstract

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has produced the most comprehensive assessment of climate change ever. The Fifth Assessment Report, which the IPCC is releasing in four parts between September 2013 and November 2014, is the work of 830 expert authors, from 85 countries.

Abstract

The publication, Considering Multiple Futures: Scenario Planning to Address Uncertainty in Natural Resource Conservation, presents scenario planning as an approach to help natural resource managers accommodate the uncertainty involved with combined threats to habitats and wildlife, including climate change, habitat fragmentation, land use, and invasive species.

Abstract

Most scientists now agree that climate change, i.e., global warming, is occurring at a rate much faster than the normal climatic cycles, due to anthropogenic causes of greenhouse gases. Because global warming is changing the ocean currents and wind patterns, climate is changing world-wide. Some of these changes are beneficial, such as a longer growing season for farmers; however, most are harmful.

Abstract

The City of Keene is already practicing many climate protection strategies. Much of this document lays the foundation for Keene to move forward with a public process and further refinement of its climate change and overall sustainability goals. Another important process Keene is preparing for is a comprehensive master plan update, wherein the community, City, and other local and regional stakeholders will play a major role in setting the course for Keene’s future.

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date review of the extent to which climate change is occurring in the Y2Y region, and to assess the appropriateness of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative’s vision and programs as a response to climate disruption. Even the most optimistic models forecast that if greenhouse-gas emissions could be reined in today, and climate change mitigation efforts optimized, the momentum of global climate change could not be stopped for at least another century.

Abstract

From the Introduction:This review aims to answer the question: what is the threat of climate change to birds? Knowledge in this field is advancing rapidly. More is known about birds than any other class of animals, and of all groups of plants and animals the scientific analysis of likely future impacts from climate change is most developed for birds. Furthermore, birds provide some of the clearest examples of impacts already underway.

Abstract

A key finding of the Global Assessment Report on Forest Adaptation prepared in the frame of the CPF Global Forest Expert Panels (GFEP) was that the amount and quality of globally available scientific information varies significantly among regions. The particular impacts of change and the appropriate adaptive responses are local, and hence there is a need for adaptation reports to be tailored to regional areas.

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