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Abstract

Due to historic greenhouse gas emissions and their long-lasting atmospheric lifetimes we are committed to an inevitable degree of climate change. TheClimate Adaptation Tool (CAT) is a risk management and adaptive decision making tool designed to guide organisations through the full process ofadapting to the risks that inevitable climate change poses. In this process there are 3 stages:

Abstract

Here, we provide guidelines for doing a simple and rapid climate impact assessment for any number of management objectives. Such a rapid assessment focuses on identifying major climate trends and potential impacts using existing expertise and a few key web resources. We have based these guidelines on the Adaptation for Conservation Targets (ACT) framework (Cross et al., 2012). The assessment could be conducted over the course of a one- or two-day workshop.

Abstract

This report was created by Mayor Menino's Climate Preparedness Task Force, a Cabinet-level group convened in February 2013. The report identifies ways in which the City of Boston has and will prepare for the impacts of climate change on municipal operations.

Abstract

Sea levels are rising at an accelerating rate, and the scientific community is confident that global warming is the most important cause. Higher sea levels translate to more and higher coastal floods. Using local sea level projections based on global scenarios from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and also used by the four-county Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, this analysis finds that floods rising 3 ft above the high tide line at Key West are near certain this century under any sea level rise scenario.

Abstract

Climate change is already occurring in Minnesota and is affecting our state’s environmental, economic and social systems. Minnesota state government is taking action to address these emerging challenges. A new report describing climate trends and impacts, as well as Minnesota state government responses, has been issued by the state’s ICAT.The focus of this report is climate adaptation, which is defined as developing and implementing strategies, initiatives and measures to help human and natural systems cope with climate change impacts.

Abstract

This paper presents IOM’s efforts to support vulnerable and mobile communities affected by environmental hazards through disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) activities conducive to sustainable development.IOM’s programmes around the world have demonstrated the effectiveness of DRR and CCA for reducing risk exposure and vulnerability and for improved management of migration, particularly in times of crisis.

Abstract

National park environments are characterized by dynamic landscapes. Tides ebb and surge along shifting coastlines. Wildfires and diseases invade forests. Wind and water erode historic structures. Plant populations adapt, animals migrate to survive, and humans adjust. However, a rapidly changing climate is triggering even more alterations, forcing cautious confrontation and thoughtful response.Careful stewardship of natural and cultural resources is being challenged by the accelerated rate at which scientific information must be acquired, understood, and conveyed.

Abstract

Sea levels are rising at an accelerating rate, and the scientific community is confident that global warming is the most important cause. Higher sea levels translate to more and higher coastal floods. Using local sea level projections based on National Climate Assessment scenarios, this analysis finds a 3-in-4 chance of historically unprecedented coastal flooding in the northern New Jersey/New York Harbor area by 2100, assuming sea level rises on the fast end of the spectrum; or a 1-in-10 chance under a slow rise scenario as might be expected under reduced carbon emissions.

Abstract

Sea levels are rising at an accelerating rate, and the scientific community is confident that global warming is the most important cause. Higher sea levels translate to more and higher coastal floods.

Abstract

The federal government invests billions of dollars annually in infrastructure, such as roads and bridges, facing increasing risks from climate change. Adaptation—defined as adjustments to natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climate change— can help manage these risks by making infrastructure more resilient.GAO was asked to examine issues related to infrastructure decision making and climate change.

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