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Abstract

The objective of this assessment is to present an analysis of the issues that affect capacity to implement Puerto Rico’s Coral Reef Management Priorities (NOAA, 2010) and Local Action Strategies (LAS) for Coral Reef Conservation 2011-2015 Puerto Rico (NOAA, 2011), and an associated set of recommendations that could lead to an action strategy to build adaptive capacity to address current management objectives.

Abstract

This white paper provides an overview of the aquaculture sector in northeastern region of the United States (the coastal waters from Maine to Connecticut). It describes the current status of the sector as well as key issues and trends that are relevant to aquaculture, including issues that provide context but may not be related to ocean planning. The paper was commissioned by the Northeast Regional Ocean Council (NROC) to support NROC efforts to reach out and engage with stakeholders in the aquaculture sector.

Abstract

The Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (NES LME) has undergone sustained perturbations due to environmental and anthropogenic impacts over the last four decades, resulting in fundamental changes in system structure. Thermal conditions in the NES LME are changing due to warming of coastal and shelf waters and cooling in the northern end of the range. As a consequence, there has been a constriction of thermal habitats in the ecosystem, a northward shift in the distributions of some fish species and a shift to a warmer-water fish community.

Abstract

Many aquatic animals and plants are cultured commercially in the northeastern United States, while others have been grown for restoration or for use in research. Finfish, shellfish, aquatic plants, and other organisms are cultured commercially and recreationally for food, bait, stocking, research, bioassay tests, ornamental markets, and instructional aids. Table 1 lists 33 species or varieties of marine animals and plants cultured in the region.

Abstract

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Series, U.S. Caribbean Fishing Communities, is the result of the Southeast Fisheries Science Center’s Caribbean Sustainable Fishing Communities Initiative, which was brought about by the recognition that the success of coral reef conservation strategies hinges on the ability to reconcile the need to protect coral reef and associated environments with the local cultural, economic, political and social requirements of coastal communities.

Abstract

From Texas to Florida, the Gulf coast region is rich with ecological resources that support the region’s economic wealth. Over time, human activities from dam construction to shoreline development have dramatically altered natural landscapes, waterways, and ecological processes. Pressures from human activities remain the most important agents of ecological change in the region today. Over the century ahead, land-use changes are likely to increase as rapid population growth continues.

Abstract

Climate changes are already affecting some aspects of society, the economy and natural ecosystems of Puerto Rico and these effects are expected to increase. Not all of these changes will be gradual. When certain tipping points are crossed, impacts can increase dramatically. Past climate is no longer a reliable guide to the future. This affects planning for public and private infrastructure, tourism and industry, water resources, energy and all other social and economic systems.

Abstract

The primary purpose of this assessment is to examine the issues that affect capacity in the CNMI as it relates to implementing the priorities expressed in the PSD and present a set of near-term recommendations for addressing persistent capacity gaps and barriers. The recommendations are offered in an appreciation of the context of the CNMI. Implementation of the recommendations will require an implementation strategy that is adaptive.

Abstract

The Gulf Coast region includes five Gulf Coast states. The specific territories covered in the assessment are the Gulf Coastal Plains and coastal waters of southern Texas, southern Louisiana, southern Mississippi, southern Alabama, and western Florida (Fig. 1). The Gulf itself has a surface area of 1.63 million square kilometers (630,000 square miles) and a watershed area of 4.69 million square kilometers (1.81 million square miles) in the United States. This region is one of the nation’s largest ecological systems and is closely linked to a significant portion of the nation’s economy.

Abstract

Hawaii’s aquaculture is a fast-growing diversified agricultural sector that has doubled over the past ten years. Today there is much interest in expanding the industry with policy makers viewing it as a potential source for job creation and enhancing state export earnings. However up until now, policy makers and industry participants have known very little about the economic performance and health of the industry. Such information is essential to help guide an effective strategy for growth.

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