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Abstract

Whatever happens to future greenhouse gas emissions, we are now locked into inevitable changes to climate patterns. Adaptation to climate change is therefore no longer a secondary and long-term response option only to be used as a last resort. It is now prevalent and imperative, and for those communities already vulnerable to the impacts of present day climate hazards, an urgent imperative. Successful adaptation must be accomplished through actions that target and reduce the vulnerabilities poor people now face, as they are likely to become more prevalent as the climate changes.

Abstract

Climate change and desertification/land degradation can adversely affect natural resources and ecosystems thus decreasing biological diversity. At the same time, conservation and management of biodiversity can increase ecosystems’ resilience thus lowering their vulnerability to climate change. One of the identified areas for possible synergies is adaptation to the adverse effects of climate change, which is a necessity regardless of the level of action taken to mitigate global warming.

Abstract

This book, in English, French and Spanish, provides an overview of the Mediterranean forest conservation and management challenges posed by climate change. It addresses relevant issues, like forests’ vulnerability to climate change and past climate change responses which may guide future policies and actions.

Abstract

Since publishing Seasons’ End: Global Warming’s Threat to Hunting and Fishing, the urgency to address the effects of climate change on fish and wildlife has become increasingly evident. Already waterfowl exhibit changes in seasonal distribution. Higher water temperatures and diminished stream habitat are threatening coldwater fish such as trout and salmon. Big game are shifting to more northerly latitudes and to higher elevations to escape summer heat and find suitable forage.

Abstract

Human dimensions in global environmental change research emphasize the importance of advancing the concepts and methods for vulnerability assessment. The aim of intervulnerability project was to contribute to these efforts by proposing a conceptual framework that demands a shift in foci of vulnerability studies from generic indices to adaptive agents and by applying a method of agent-based systems to take into account the dynamics of human-environment interactions.

Abstract

The growing threat of climate change combined with escalating anthropogenic stressors on coral reefs requires a response that is both proactive and adaptive. To respond to this challenge, The Nature Conservancy convened a group of global ocean experts in Honolulu, Hawaii from August 12-14, 2008. The workshop participants included oceanographers, climate experts, marine scientists, and coral reef managers from around the world.

Abstract

The diverse landscapes of the U.S. Midwest, and the natural processes, livelihoods, and infrastructure associated with them, are vulnerable to climate change. This report, pre- pared as a contribution to the Third National Climate Assessment, addresses the poten- tial impacts of climate change on natural systems, human health, and several important economic sectors within the Midwest. Key findings of the report include the following:

Abstract

Climate change is already affecting millions of people worldwide. In urban areas, which are typically characterized by significantly higher population density, climate change will exacerbate and compound existing climate vulnerabilities, especially for the urban poor. As a result of climate change, it is expected that storm frequency and intensity will increase, flooding will become more serious and droughts will affect food production in rural areas, which will have damaging effects in cities. Coastal areas are particularly threatened by inundation from storm surges and sea-level rise.

Abstract

Climate change is already affecting millions of people worldwide. In urban areas, which are typically characterized by significantly higher population density, climate change will exacerbate and compound existing climate vulnerabilities, especially for the urban poor. As a result of climate change, it is expected that storm frequency and intensity will increase, flooding will become more serious and drought will affect food production in rural areas, which will have damaging effects in urban areas. Coastal areas are also threatened by inundation from storm surges and sea-level rise.

Abstract

Climate change is already affecting millions of people worldwide. In urban areas, which are typically characterized by a significantly higher population density, climate change will exacerbate and compound existing vulnerabilities, especially for the urban poor. As a result of climate change, we expect that storm frequency and intensity will increase, flooding will become increasingly significant and droughts will affect food production in rural areas, which will result in damaging knock-on effects in urban areas.

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