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Abstract

In recognition of a growing body of scientific evidence, and in response to certain specific local events, the Swinomish Indian Senate issued a proclamation in 2007 directing action to study the possible effects of climate change on the Swinomish Indian Reservation community, lands, and resources and determine appropriate responses.1 Following this proclamation, the Tribe initiated a two-year project in late 2008 to assess how climate change may affect the Swinomish Indian Reservation and to develop strategies to address potential impacts.

Abstract

The Shinnecock Environmental Department and the Natural Resource Committee had begun researching climate change, and particularly the impacts on surface water and ocean acidification, because of tribal shellfish cultivation. The next large concern was the increasing shoreline erosion, which is contributing to the loss of trees. The staff began researching other climate change issues that were impacting the region as well. Climate change is included in the Shinnecock Nation’s strategic plan.

Abstract

Coastal and marine spatial planning (CMSP) is a science-based, collaborative process used to sustainably manage resources, interests, and activities among diverse coastal and ocean users and sectors. Climate change is affecting marine and coastal ecosystems throughout the world, manifesting in warming air and sea temperatures, increasing coastal storms, and rising sea levels. The existing and projected impacts of climate change and ocean acidification need to be incorporated into planning processes to ensure long-term success.

Abstract

The Clearwater River Subbasin comprises much of the original homeland of the Nez Perce Tribe (Tribe) and still is the largest population center for the Tribe. Historically, the Nez Perce people were hunters and gatherers and thrived on abundant salmon, elk and deer, camas and other roots and berries. The protection of these resources is a fundamental mission of the Nez Perce Tribe. The first documented non-Indians to traverse this area were members of the Lewis and Clark expedition, who paddled down the Clearwater River in dugout canoes in 1805.

Abstract

Climate change refers to change over time due to natural variability or as a result of human activity (IPCC, 2008). Alaska is experiencing a wide range of impacts from climate change and communities seek adaptive strategies that encourage wellness and sustainability. This report documents climate change impacts as described by community residents and climate change effects or potential effects as interpreted through the lens of public health.

Abstract

Rural Arctic communities are vulnerable to climate change and seek adaptation strategies that will protect health and health infrastructure. This report describes climate change impacts on Kivalina, a small Inupiat Eskimo community located on the coast of the Chukchi Sea. Data sources included the observations of local residents, reports from local and regional government of cials and health professionals, and scienti c evidence gathered from published sources.

Abstract

Rural Arctic communities are vulnerable to climate change and residents seek adaptive strategies that will protect health and health infrastructure. In the Inupiat community of Kiana, climate change is impacting the weather, land, river, wildlife, plants, and the lives of the people who live there. Identi ed health concerns include food insecurity, damage to water and sanitation infrastructure, and increased risk of injury related to unpredictable weather conditions.

Abstract

In 2012 the Bristol Bay Native Association (BBNA) in partnership with Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC) and the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) began evaluating the connecting between climate change impacts and health. The purpose, to encourage wellness and to adapt to changes in the Bristol Bay region.

Abstract

Understanding local impact of climate change is important for assessing negative and positive effects, and developing appropriate adaptation strategies. In Atqasuk, residents report changes to the weather, seasons, landscape, plants, wildlife and infrastructure, with important implications for public health. Atqasuk is a river community, vulnerable to thawing of permafrost and erosion on the river bank and in tundra lakes. The community is also impacted by weather and vegetation on the land and concerned about how climate change will affect wild food resources.

Abstract

The Bering Strait region has long been characterized by permafrost and ice, an environment that was mostly cold and frozen. Human habitation in the region dates back some 10,000 years from the time of Beringia. While the ice ages covered most of North America with glaciers, Beringia was a vast grassland; a temperate refuge in an otherwise frozen north.

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