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Abstract

Climate change is an unprecedented issue in modern times, posing a number of challenges to sustainable forest management (SFM) in Canada. These challenges include how best to plan and adapt for an uncertain future. The Canadian Council of Forest Ministers (CCFM) has recognized the need to minimize the risks and maximize the opportunities that climate change presents for Canada’s forests and forest sector and has therefore initiated collaborative, interjurisdictional work on adaptation in forestry.

Abstract

Innovative and unique solutions are being devised throughout the national park system to adapt to climate change in coastal parks. The 24 case studies in this document describe efforts at national park units in a variety of settings to prepare for and respond to climate change impacts that can take the form of either an event or a trend. Examples of these impacts include increased storminess, sea level rise, shoreline erosion, melting sea ice and permafrost, ocean acidification, warming temperatures, groundwater inundation, precipitation, and drought.

Abstract

This report is designed to serve as a reference for individuals interested in understanding the state of the science on climate change and its effects within the Puget Sound region. We define the Puget Sound region to include the water bodies of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, as well as any United States land areas that ultimately drain into these waters.

Abstract

From relatively limited and narrow uses two decades ago, the concept of vulnerability has emerged as a key dimension of the development debate. Be it in relation to climate change, disasters, globalization and economic development, and social–ecological system changes more generally, vulnerability is a complex and multifaceted concept that has attracted the attention of scholars and development practitioners from all disciplines. The many interpretations of vulnerability and its many scales (e.g.

Abstract

A secretarial order identified climate adaptation as a critical performance objective for future management of U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) lands and resources in response to global change. Vulnerability assessments can inform climate adaptation planning by providing insight into what natural resources are most at risk and why. Three components of vulnerability—exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity—were defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as necessary for identifying climate adaptation strategies and actions.

Abstract

The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) aims to improve the ability of coastal communities to reduce risks from sea level rise and coastal storms through the use of natural infrastructure and nature-based measures.

Abstract

Resilient Cities is the global forum on urban resilience and adaptation convened in Bonn, Germany. The congress series provides an international platform to share the latest information, good practices, challenges, and innovations for creating more resilient cities. The outcomes present an annual snapshot of the state of urban resilience, building on discussions and developments from previous years.

Abstract

This report represents the culmination of a project completed in two phases funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The first phase focused on adapting a process developed by The Nature Conservancy in the Northeastern US to identify and map sites most resilient to climate change (Anderson et al. 2012) to the landscapes and environments of the Pacific Northwest. The 67 million hectare project area included all of the Columbia Plateau, East Cascades/Modoc Plateau, and Middle Rockies/Blue Mountains ecoregions as well as the US portion of the Canadian Rockies (see map 4.1).

Abstract

The Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center (NE CSC) conducts research that responds to the regional natural resource management community’s needs to anticipate, monitor, and adapt to climate change. The NE CSC is supported by a consortium of partners that includes the University of Massachusetts Amherst, College of Menominee Nation, Columbia University, Marine Biological Laboratory, University of Minnesota, University of Missouri Columbia, and University of Wisconsin.

Abstract

Climate change has arrived in America’s National Parks. Native trees and animals are losing ground because changing temperature and weather patterns are making the availability of food, water, and shelter less certain. Fish and wildlife are being driven from their national park homes by changes that are unfolding faster than the animals’ ability to adapt. If we fail to act, some wildlife may even go extinct.

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