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Abstract

The USAID Global Climate Change Office is pleased to release this framework for understanding and addressing the risks of climate change for development. This framework updates the approach presented in 2007 in USAID’s Adapting to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual for Development Planning.

Abstract

The CDP report “Climate Change Resilience in Europe” provides actionable insight for businesses and serves as an invaluable tool to facilitate informed decision making by business leaders, governments and policy makers across Europe.

The report’s key findings include:

Abstract

The overwhelming evidence of human-caused climate change documents both current impacts with significant costs and extraordinary future risks to society and natural systems. The scientific community has convened conferences, published reports, spoken out at forums and proclaimed, through statements by virtually every national scientific academy and relevant major scientific organization — including the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) — that climate change puts the well-being of people of all nations at risk.

Abstract

According to the NRC and the USGCRP, changes in the earth's climate--including higher temperatures, changes in precipitation, rising sea levels, and increases in the severity and frequency of severe weather events--are under way and expected to grow more severe over time. These impacts present significant risks to the nation's energy infrastructure.

Abstract

This landmark report demonstrates the carbon sequestration benefits of restoring tidal wetlands in the Snohomish estuary in Puget Sound, Wash. The report was prepared by Restore America’s Estuaries, Ecological Science Associates (ESA), Western Washington University, and EarthCorps. Lead funding for the study was provided by NOAA’s Office of Habitat Conservation. The Boeing Company and the Wildlife Forever Fund provided additional financial support.

Abstract

This report presents the findings from a national climate change adaptation survey conducted by eight Sea Grant programs across the U.S. (Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois-Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Oregon, and Washington). The survey was developed to understand the opinions, current phase of planning, and information needs of coastal/resource professionals and elected officials regarding climate change and adaptation to it.Results from the survey indicate that most coastal/resource professionals seem to believe climate change is occurring in their area.

Abstract

Livestock production systems in the LMB range from traditional smallholder livestock-keeping systems to large highly productive commercial enterprises. Traditional systems are small-scale, low intensity, low-input, low-output systems, typically raising stock of local genetics and with limited market orientation. They contribute well over 90% of total numbers of producers in the LMB, and over 50% of total production. These systems dominate the higher elevation forested and more sloping ecozones and typically are associated with low-income, vulnerable households.

Abstract

This report presents the results of the fisheries component of the USAID Mekong ARCC Climate Change Impact and Adaptation Study. It first provides an overview of the current state of the important capture fisheries and aquaculture systems in the LMB, focusing on those elements that are threatened by climate change. This report then presents a methodology and results for vulnerability assessments, carried out using a CAM approach, for six climate change hotspots (Chiang Rai, Khammoun, Gia Lai, Mondulkiri, Kien Giang, and Stung Treng).

Abstract

Growing conditions for agriculture are diverse in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), from the mountainous areas of Lao PDR and the Central Highlands in Vietnam to the lowland plains in the Mekong Delta. Farming systems range from traditional shifting agriculture systems dominated by upland rice through industrial plantations, including smallholder intensive rice farmers.Rainfed agriculture is the dominant type of agriculture in the LMB. Rainfed rice is the dominant crop, representing 75% of the agricultural area within the LMB.

Abstract

The USAID Mekong ARCC project is a five- year project (2011-2016) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Regional Development Mission for Asia (RDMA) in Bangkok and implemented by Development Alternatives Inc. (DAI) in partnership with International Centre for Environmental Management (ICEM) and World Resources Institute (WRI).

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