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Abstract

This report represents a synthesis and summary of frameworks for the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of climate change adaptation and resilience (CCAR) interventions, with a specific focus on international development projects and programmes.The objective of this report is to:

Abstract

Climate change already is having significant impacts on the nation’s species and ecosystems, and these effects are projected to increase considerably over time. As a result, climate change is now a primary lens through which conservation and natural resource management must be viewed. How should we prepare for and respond to the impacts of climate change on wildlife and their habitats? What should we be doing differently in light of these climatic shifts, and what actions continue to make sense?

Abstract

As California considers how to adapt to a changing climate, planners often focus on defensive infrastructure with a negative habitat impact: bigger levees, rock walls to protect coastlines or even giant sea gates.

But California can follow a different path. With natural or “green” infrastructure that leverages natural processes to reduce risk to human lives, property and businesses, the state can build resilience to the coming changes while restoring natural habitats instead of degrading them.

Abstract

This document describes planning tools being used across Canada to help communities prepare for climate change, increase adaptive capacity and build resilience. It is directed to individuals and groups interested in climate change adaptation at the local level, including planners and other local government staff, elected officials, community organizations, local residents and business leaders.

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to capture best practices and lessons learned from experts in the field who are contributing to an integrated approach to climate adaptation + mitigation (A+M) to cut carbon pollution (mitigation) and prepare the nation for climate change impacts (adaptation).

Abstract

Many coastal communities across the United States are beginning to plan for climate-related sea level rise. While impacts and solutions will vary with local conditions, jurisdictions which have begun this process seem to pass through three common stages when developing policy for local sea level rise adaptation: 1) building awareness about local sea level rise threats, 2) undertaking analyses of local vulnerabilities, and 3) developing plans and policies to deal with these vulnerabilities.

Abstract

The National Climate Assessment assesses the science of climate change and its impacts across the United States, now and throughout this century. It documents climate change related impacts and responses for various sectors and regions, with the goal of better informing public and private decision-making at all levels.

Abstract

Our goal with this report is to provide the Navajo Nation and its communities with information that we hope will be useful for the Nation as it engages in adaptation planning in response to climate change and variability. In Chapter 1, we discuss actions being undertaken by Native peoples around the United States in response to climate change and also provide some context about federal Indian law and the Navajo Reservation.

Abstract

State, federal, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are investing significant resources to conduct landscape-scale assessments of the location, condition, and vulnerability of renewable natural resources. These assessments provide critical information on contiguous landscapes (e.g., ecoregions, watersheds, habitats, communities) that can be vital to a range of partners in developing landscape-scale management strategies and plans. They also provide important perspectives for subsequent finer scale management, assessment, and monitoring.

Abstract

Today, extreme weather events such as coastal floods, wildfires, intense precipitation (snow and rain), heat waves, and droughts are becoming more frequent and severe in some regions. Sea level rise is already worsening coastal floods, and other extreme weather events are likely to become more severe as the planet continues to warm. Building power plants and electricity infrastructure in areas prone to climate-related threats adds to those growing risks.

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