Subscribe to RSS - Whitepaper / Report

Abstract

West Africa is among the most vulnerable regions to climate change worldwide. The often disastrous impact of climate variability and extreme events over the past thirty years is a striking illustration and a harbinger of this vulnerability. It is therefore urgent that decision-makers and the general public in West Africa be fully sensitized on the climatic challenges facing the region and actions to be taken, to enhance the region’s level of preparedness in order to cope with predictable impacts of climate variability and change and the associated extreme events.

Abstract

This assessment was prepared over the past five years by an international team of over 300 scientists, other experts, and knowledgeable members of the indigenous communities. The lead authors were selected from open nominations provided by AMAP, CAFF, IASC, the Indigenous Peoples Secretariat, the Assessment Steering Committee, and several national and international scientific organizations.

Abstract

From the Introduction:Climate provides fundamental limits on and opportunities for human activities and ecosystem functioning within the Great Lakes region. A changing climate could lead to alterations in the frequency and severity of droughts and floods; water supply; air, soil, and water quality; ecosystem health; human health; and resource use and the economy. Climate change may act through multiple pathways; interactions in and impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem can be dynamic and non-linear.

Abstract

This paper synthesises much of the current scientific knowledge on coral reef resistance and resilience to bleaching, a possible major effect of climate change. Following a brief overview of coral bleaching and what is meant by resistance and resilience, the paper highlights a variety of resistance and resilience factors and identifies some gaps in knowledge. It continues by providing an overview of some of the tools and strategies we can use to enhance coral reef resilience.

Abstract

In recent years, global warming has come to the fore as one of the world’s most serious environmental problems. Meanwhile, over the past ten years, international negotiations and the accumulation of scientific knowledge in this field have led to remarkable progress — such as the adoption and entry into force of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the adoption of the Kyoto Protocol, and the release of the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Abstract

Advice to Government on linkages between biodiversity and climate change was prepared by Landcare Research, Lincoln, for the Ministry for the Environment in June – August 2001.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Whitepaper / Report