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Abstract

All around us, the chorus of voices calling for renewed investment in our nation’s critical water infrastructure is growing. Yet while the calls amplify, harmony remains elusive.There is widespread agreement that our water systems desperately need investment if they are to sustain the critical services they provide to economies. As to how those systems should perform, how we should pay for them and how we should value them—there, unanimity dissolves.

Abstract

Preparing for change requires individuals, institutions, and sectors to work together. Climate change adaptation action on the ground and across all levels of decision making within the marine biodiversity and resources sector should be guided by the most recent adaptation science, research and practice. A series of high level guiding principles have been drafted (this document). They reflect the knowledge and expertise of researchers, resource managers, policy makers and resource users with direct experience in developing or applying adaptation knowledge.

Abstract

The Great Barrier Reef Climate Change Action Plan 2007–2012 (Action Plan) represents a concerted effort by governments, industries and communities to identify and test strategies that can help give the Great Barrier Reef the best chance of coping with climate change.

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Current models predict that Boston will experience up to two feet of sea level rise by 2050 and up to six feet by 2100. Planning and preparing for this growing threat will save money and prevent disruption of people’s lives and livelihoods. This report provides vulnerability analyses for Boston Harbor and time-phased preparedness plans for Boston’s Long and Central Wharves and UMass Boston campus to increase their resilience to coastal flooding over time.

Abstract

State and federal natural resource management agencies, having been directed to integrate climate change into their plans and activities, are calling upon academic institutions and non-governmental conservation organizations to help them design and carry out climate vulnerability assessments. Such assessments have proliferated, and the science and methods used to generate them are evolving rapidly. In order to effectively design and implement these vulnerability assessments, conservationists need guidance, practical and effective methods and tools.

Abstract

The Nature Conservancy (TNC) convened a two-day climate adaptation workshop for the Bear River Basin on May 26 and 27, 2010, in Salt Lake City, Utah. The goal of the workshop was to identify management strategies that will help native plants, animals and ecosystems adapt to a changing climate and lay the groundwork for adaptation action. Thirty-nine participants representing 20 public agencies, private organizations, and academic institutions attended the workshop.The objectives of the workshop were to:

Abstract

This document, The United States National Climate Assessment–Alaska Technical Regional Report, is one of eight regional reports that will provide input to the 2013 National Climate Assessment. It was produced through the leadership of the 2012 NCA Alaska Region Technical Report Writing Team (appendix A), but is the culmination of the efforts of many contributing authors who are recognized in appendix B. Discussions began in 2011 (fig. 1) and the process included four public outreach events.

Abstract

The Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a comprehensive assessment of the physical science basis of climate change. It builds upon the Working Group I contribution to the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report in 2007 and incorporates subsequent new findings from the Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation, as well as from research published in the extensive scientific and technical literature.

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This accompanying document to Climate Change Adaptation Workshop for Natural Resource Managers in the Gunnison Basin: Summary provides the workshop ageneda, full participant list, and impacts to and adaptation strategies derived for sage-grouse, headwaters, and alpine wetlands in the Gunnison Basin.

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Whether we call it climate change or long-term drought and warmer weather, people living in the deserts, grasslands, and forests of Arizona are noticing changes in the landscape.How would northern Arizona be if its forests were severely limited in extent?What would it be like to have no snow in the mountains?On 7-8 April 2010, 44 representatives of 15 state and federal agencies, local governments and non-governmental organizations met in Flagstaff, Arizona to address these and other questions posed for forests, wildlife and communities within the Four Forest Restoration In

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