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Abstract

Climate change and extreme weather events are already affecting the way that American Indian and Alaska Native tribes are using, receiving, and producing energy. As climate change worsens, energy infrastructure in the United States—including tribal energy infrastructure—is expected to be increasingly threatened by higher temperatures, less available water, and more frequent and intense heavy downpours, floods, heat waves, and droughts.

Abstract

The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife and the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment jointly developed a climate-change vulnerability assessment for priority wildlife and plant species and habitats on the Navajo landscape. The priority species and habitats included in this analysis were identified by the entire staff of NNDFW through a structured planning process.

Location

United States
51° 28' 31.4256" N, 127° 58' 7.5" W
US

Project Summary

The Marine Plan Partnership for the North Pacific Coast (MaPP) is a collaboration between British Columbia’s Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, and First Nations representing the Coastal First Nations-Great Bear Initiative, the North Coast-Skeena First Nations Stewardship Society, and the Nanwakolas Council. EcoAdapt partnered with MaPP in 2012-2015 to facilitate the integration of climate change into marine use plans for the four subregions: Haida Gwaii, North Coast, Central Coast, and North Vancouver Island.

Abstract

Coastal and marine spatial planning (CMSP) is a science-based, collaborative process used to sustainably manage resources, interests, and activities among diverse coastal and ocean users and sectors. Climate change is affecting marine and coastal ecosystems throughout the world, manifesting in warming air and sea temperatures, increasing coastal storms, and rising sea levels. The existing and projected impacts of climate change and ocean acidification need to be incorporated into planning processes to ensure long-term success.

Adaptation Workbook

Location

United States
47° 6' 52.5888" N, 88° 32' 50.6724" W
US
Tool Overview: 

AdaptationWorkbook.org is a new web-based tool for land management and conservation. The Adaptation Workbook is a structured process to consider the potential effects of climate change and design land management and conservation actions that can help prepare for changing conditions. The Workbook provides users with a flexible, logical process to consider climate change information and design their own customized management actions that can help achieve their management objectives.

Populations at Risk

Location

Headwaters Economics
PO Box 7059
59771 Bozeman , MT
United States
45° 40' 48" N, 111° 2' 24" W
Montana US
Tool Overview: 

Events such as climate change, extreme weather, floods, wildfires, and significant economic changes affect some populations more than others. Populations at Risk is a free tool to easily create reports about populations more likely to experience adverse social, health, or economic outcomes in selected areas of the United States. Variables used include indicators such as race, ethnicity, housing, poverty, and education, among others. Produced in Excel or PDF format, reports may be created at the community, county, or state scale and may compare several geographies.

Abstract

The University of Arizona Native Nations Climate Adaptation Program (NNCAP) and Center for Climate Adaptation Science and Solutions (CCASS) hosted the NNCAP Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change: A Focus on Climate Adaptation Planning and Implementation at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona on November 12 and 13, 2015. The summit was sponsored by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative, the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice, the Southwest Climate Science Center, and the UA Institute of the Environment (see Appendix D).

Abstract

Federal agencies released updated adaptation and sustainability plans on October 31, 2014. The updated plans build and improve upon the first phase of plans released in 2013. For the first time the plans include discussion of how agencies can leverage existing federal programs to better support and remove barriers to state, local, and tribal adaptation efforts.

Abstract

A growing body of literature examines the vulnerability, risk, resilience, and adaptation of indigenous peoples to climate change. This synthesis of literature brings together research pertaining to the impacts of climate change on sovereignty, culture, health, and economies that are currently being experienced by Alaska Native and American Indian tribes and other indigenous communities in the United States.

Location

Vancouver
Canada
49° 16' 57.8244" N, 123° 7' 14.6568" W
CA
Organization Overview: 

The MaPP initiative is a partnership between the Province of British Columbia and 17 member First Nations that developed marine use plans for B.C.’s North Pacific Coast. The MaPP region is divided into four sub-regions: Haida GwaiiNorth CoastCentral Coast and North Vancouver I

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