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Location

United States
46° 45' 35.7732" N, 66° 26' 43.1268" W

Project Summary/Overview

New Brunswick, Canada has approximately 5,500 kilometers (km) of coastline and is vulnerable to rising sea levels and increased storminess. In response to this vulnerability, a three-year study was undertaken to forecast likely climate changes, anticipate physical impacts of these changes, and identify potential adaptation strategies.

Location

United States
53° 11' 26.4372" N, 132° 13' 53.202" W

Project Summary/Overview

Graham Island is the most northern of the Queen Charlotte Islands and is located off the North Pacific coast of British Columbia. The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) has classified the northeast area of Graham Island as extremely sensitive to sea level rise, and two communities, Masset and Old Masset, are already experiencing flooding and coastal erosion. In response to this vulnerability, the Earth Sciences Sector of Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Institute of Planners co-sponsored a study to assess the human and biophysical vulnerability to climate change on Graham Island, as well as community resilience and adaptive capacity.

Location

United States
35° 16' 10.3512" N, 76° 54' 15.4692" W

Project Summary/Overview

In early 2007, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR) invited North Carolina coastal managers and stakeholders to participate in a workshop to identify and discuss the utility of modeling and mapping tools in planning for and mitigating the regional impacts of rising sea levels and increasing storm intensity. The purpose of the workshop was to help scientists design user-friendly tools that will facilitate management planning for the effects of long-term climate changes.

Location

United States
19° 48' 22.7952" N, 86° 10' 36.3288" W
Organization: 

Project Summary/Overview

The Mesoamerican Reef is the largest barrier reef in the Western Hemisphere. The reef sustains over two million people living in the region, which spans the tip of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula through Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras. The combined effects of current anthropogenic stressors (e.g., pollution, overfishing) when coupled with climate change impacts such as sea level rise, increased seawater temperatures, and a reduction in calcium carbonate will have devastating consequences for the Mesoamerican Reef system. With funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development and the Summit and Oak Foundations, a number of stakeholders came together to conduct a vulnerability assessment of the reef system and develop a series of adaptation measures to increase the reef’s resilience to potential and actual impacts of climate change.

Location

United States
38° 0' 15.0804" N, 76° 0' 22.194" W

Project Summary/Overview

Somerset County received a grant through Maryland’s Coast-Smart Communities Initiative grant program to assess the county’s vulnerability to climate change and develop a plan of action to prepare for those impacts. The county reviewed existing plans, development codes, regulations, and laws to ensure the necessary policies and codes were prepared for the reality of the county’s climate future, specifically addressing sea level rise and coastal storms. The county developed the Somerset County, Maryland: Rising Sea Level Guidance document, which included a vulnerability assessment as well as recommendations on how to adapt the county’s management and codes to best prepare for climate change.

Location

United States
38° 30' 14.1768" N, 76° 4' 49.1592" W

Project Summary/Overview

Dorchester County is Maryland’s second largest county and includes over 350,000 acres of wetlands, tidal marshes, creeks, and other low-lying lands. Around half of the county’s landscape lies at elevations below 4.9 feet, making it one of Maryland’s most at-risk counties to sea level rise. With financial and technical support from Maryland’s Coast-Smart Communities Initiative grant program, the county developed Sea Level Rise: A Technical Guidance for Dorchester County. This plan covers four planning phases and strategies: Vulnerability and Impact Assessment; Long-Range Comprehensive Planning; Codes, Regulations, and Development Strategies; and Public Education and Outreach. The county reviewed existing plans, development codes, regulations, and laws to ensure the necessary policies and codes were prepared for the reality of the county’s climate future impacts, specifically sea level rise and coastal storms.

Location

United States
35° 17' 36.4488" N, 77° 31' 10.3116" W

Project Summary/Overview

The North Carolina Sea Level Rise (NC SLR) Project is a pilot study intended to improve scientific understanding of the ecological effects of sea level rise and storm surge on North Carolina coastal habitats and develop better models and tools to forecast these effects. Managers and planners were invited to attend a two-day workshop to discuss ways in which the findings from the NC SLR Project could be used to answer management needs and aid decision-making.

Location

United States
35° 16' 57.9072" N, 120° 39' 34.6176" W
Organization: 

Project Summary/Overview

Climate change is likely to affect natural and human systems in San Luis Obispo (SLO) County including impacts to agriculture, human health, natural resources, infrastructure, emergency response needs, and tourism. The National Center for Conservation Science and Policy (now the Geos Institute), in partnership with the Local Government Commission, convened a series of workshops in SLO County to identify resources and populations that are most vulnerable to climate change and then to develop initial strategies to increase the capacity of human and natural systems to adapt to these changes. The process, called ClimateWise, was developed by the Geos Institute and continues to be refined and tested throughout the nation.

Location

United States
45° 22' 54.2424" N, 69° 3' 36.2124" W
Organization: 

Project Summary/Overview

As part of its mission, Maine Sea Grant educates communities on important marine and coastal issues. This project was developed to 1) uncover the barriers that coastal property owners and officials are faced with in preparing for climate change and coastal hazards, and 2) encourage collaboration between stakeholders to create and implement responses.

Location

United States
46° 27' 28.9548" N, 63° 27' 25.3116" W

Project Summary/Overview

Climate change is currently affecting, and will continue to affect, Atlantic Canada. Many coastal communities are experiencing climate-related impacts such as property damage, erosion of land, and increased flooding. Aboriginal communities are no exception to the impacts of climate change and must find ways to adapt. The Atlantic Aboriginal Climate Change Adaptation Workshop, which was organized by the Mi’kmaq Confederacy of Prince Edward Island (MCPEI), funded by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), and facilitated by the Indigenous Cooperative on the Environment (ICE), was held to develop a toolbox for Aboriginal First Nations to cope with the impacts of climate change and develop adaptation strategies.

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