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Abstract

Ecosystems around the world are already threatened by land-use and land-cover change, extraction of natural resources, biological disturbances, and pollution. These environmental stressors have been the primary source of ecosystem degradation to date, and climate change is now exacerbating some of their effects. Ecosystems already under stress are likely to have more rapid and acute reactions to climate change; it is therefore useful to understand how multiple stresses will interact, especially as the magnitude of climate change increases.

Abstract

Washington’s marine waters are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification because of regional factors that exacerbate the acidifying effects of global carbon dioxide emissions. One of the most important regional factors is coastal upwelling, which brings offshore water that is rich in carbon dioxide and low in pH up from the deep ocean and onto the continental shelf.

Abstract

Canada’s Pacific marine ecosystems, which lie adjacent to the coast of British Columbia, are rich, extraordinarily productive, and highly textured with conditions that vary considerably on different scales of time and space. This marine and coastal environment is unique and of cultural, socio-economic, and ecological significance to the people of British Columbia and the rest of Canada.

Abstract

The Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS) encompasses 572 square kilometers of marine and near-shore waters and intertidal habitat off of Washington State’s Pacific Ocean coast. As one of 14 national marine sanctuaries managed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), OCNMS is provided protected status because of extraordinary ecological and maritime heritage values. The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries developed its “Climate-Smart Sanctuary” program in order to facilitate the process of climate adaptation in these special marine waters.

Position Title: 
Program and Project Management Consultant
Position Title: 
Administrator, Florida Resilient Coasts
Email Address: 
Position Title: 
director

Abstract

Part of the Safeguarding Wildlife from Climate Change Web Conference Series, this webinar explores the approaches most commonly implemented to model the large-scale response of amphibians and reptiles to climate change. Steven Jackson, professor of Botany and director of the Program in Ecology at the University of Wyoming, discusses what conclusions can be drawn from vulnerability assessments and what kinds of data are necessary to execute an assessment.

Abstract

The Convention on Biological Diversity requires that member nations establish protected area networks that are representative of the country's biodiversity. The identification of priority sites to achieve outstanding representation targets is typically accomplished through formal conservation assessments. However, representation in conservation assessments or gap analyses has largely been interpreted based on a static view of biodiversity. In a rapidly changing climate, the speed of changes in biodiversity distribution and abundance is causing us to rethink the viability of this approach.

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