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Abstract

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reached a consensus in 2007 that the evidence is now “unequivocal” that the earth’s atmosphere and oceans are warming and concluded that these changes primarily are due to human activities (IPCC, 2007a). While reducing carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions is vital to stabilize the climate in the long term, excess emissions already concentrated in the atmosphere will produce significant changes in the global climate now and throughout the next century.

Abstract

Recent rapid changes in the Earth's climate have altered ecological systems around the globe. Global warming has been linked to changes in physiology, phenology, species distributions, interspecific interactions, and disturbance regimes. Projected future climate change will undoubtedly result in even more dramatic shifts in the states of many ecosystems. These shifts will provide one of the largest challenges to natural resource managers and conservation planners. Managing natural resources and ecosystems in the face of uncertain climate requires new approaches.

Abstract

Madagascar’s imperilled biota are now experiencing the effects of a new threat—climate change. With more than 90% endemism among plants, mammals, reptiles and amphibians, the stakes are high. The pristine landscapes that allowed this exceptional biodiversity to survive past climate changes are largely gone. Deforestation has claimed approximately 90% of the island’s natural forest and what remains is highly fragmented, providing a poor template for large-scale species range shifts.

Abstract

To reduce the risk of extinction due to climate change, some ecologists have suggested human-aided translocation of species, or assisted migration (AM), to areas where climate is projected to become suitable. Such intentional movement, however, may create new invasive species if successful introductions grow out of control and cause ecologic or economic damage. We assessed this risk by surveying invasive species in the United States and categorizing invaders based on origin.

Abstract

Climate change impacts to the species and ecosystems upon which human economic and ecological well-being depends receive relatively little attention from the media and the general public. Ecological forecasts of future climate impacts on the geographic ranges of iconic species produce models depicting alternative scenarios that vary dramatically in their degree of projected changes.

Abstract

Advice to Government on linkages between biodiversity and climate change was prepared by Landcare Research, Lincoln, for the Ministry for the Environment in June – August 2001.

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