The California Department of Parks and Recreation manages more than 270 park units, which contain the finest and most diverse collection of natural, cultural, and recreational resources to be found within California. These treasures are as diverse as California: From the last stands of primeval redwood forests to vast expanses of fragile desert; from the lofty Sierra Nevada to the broad sandy beaches of our southern coast; and from the opulence of Hearst Castle to the vestiges of colonial Russia.

Founded in 1994, the Alaska Marine Conservation Council (AMCC) is a community-based, non-profit organization committed to protecting the long-term health of Alaska’s marine ecosystems and sustaining the working waterfronts of our state’s coastal communities.

Our members include fishermen, subsistence harvesters, marine scientists, business owners, conservationists, families, and others who care deeply about Alaska’s oceans.

1000 Friends of Florida is a statewide nonprofit organization founded in 1986 to help build better communities and save special places.

Impacts of Climate Change on the Coastal Zone of Mexico: An Integrated Ecosystem Approach in the Gulf of Mexico to Support Coastal Zone Management Legislation

Location

United States
21° 7' 31.7928" N, 95° 48' 2.8116" W
US
Summary: 

The coastal zone of the Gulf and Caribbean coasts of Mexico is extremely vulnerable to climate change impacts. These areas are already threatened by habitat degradation, ecosystem fragmentation, increased development and population growth, and a lack of coastal zone legislation to guide management and protection. There is an urgent need to develop an integrated Environmental Strategic Plan for the coastal zone with the involvement of government, university sectors, and stakeholders, and to develop a regional coastal zone program and legislation.

Natural Solutions: Protected Areas Helping People Cope with Climate Change

Protected areas are an essential part of the global response to climate change. They are helping address the cause of climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. They are helping society cope with climate change impacts by maintaining essential services upon which people depend. Without them, the challenges would be even greater, and their strengthening will yield one of the most powerful natural solutions to the climate crisis.

Opportunities to use protected areas in climate response strategies need to be prioritised by national and local governments. At a global level, the Convention on Biological Diversity’s (CBD) Programme of Work on Protected Areas should be deployed as a major climate change mitigation and adaptation tool. The role of protected areas as part of national strategies for supporting climate change adaptation and mitigation should also be recognised by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Mapping Future Climate Change in Alaska’s National Parks

Location

United States
61° 13' 13.2384" N, 149° 53' 42.7488" W
US
Organization: 
Summary: 

Alaska is experiencing warming temperatures and increases in fire frequency and intensity among other effects of global climate change. The Wilderness Society has created maps of Alaska highlighting expected changes in temperature, precipitation, and water availability to help inform land managers and to prioritize restoration and protection activities that enhance ecosystem resilience.

Future Climate and Water Availability in Alaska

Location

United States
62° 13' 37.1856" N, 145° 53' 54.3768" W
US
Summary: 

Climate change is evidenced in Alaska by shrinking glaciers, warming temperatures, and increases in fire frequency and intensity. The Wilderness Society has created maps of Alaska highlighting expected changes in temperature, precipitation, and water availability to help inform land managers and to prioritize restoration and protection activities that enhance ecosystem resilience.

The wilderness society was established in 1935 with a founding mission to “protect wilderness and inspire Americans to care about our wild places.” To date notable accomplishments include writing and passing the Wilderness Act and protecting 109 million acres of land as designated Wilderness, over half of which is in Alaska. Projects are completed using the best available science and in collaboration with communities and conservation groups. Their key issues include: wilderness, global warming, energy, roadless forests, and stewardship.

Adapting to Sea Level Rise: Delaware's Planning Process

From the Introduction:

Sea level rise has the potential to significantly impact Delaware’s economy, coastal resources and communities over the next several decades. As a result of rising sea levels, low lying coastal areas could be inundated, storm events may become more frequent and more intense, and coastal erosion may be more severe than previously experienced. Rising sea levels can also contribute to salt water contamination of groundwater and surface water resources.  To address these concerns, a Sea Level Rise Adaptation Plan will be developed for the State of Delaware. This statewide plan will provide a framework that will allow Delawareans to proactively consider the potential effects of sea level rise when making long-term infrastructure investments and public policy decisions.

Plan for a Coordinated, Science-based Response to Climate Change Impacts on Our Land, Water, and Wildlife Resources

As the primary land, water and wildlife manager for the nation, the U.S. Department of the Interior has an obligation to address the impacts that climate change is having on America’s resources by developing integrated adaptation and mitigation strategies. In recognition of this responsibility, Secretary Salazar signed a Secretarial Order (No. 3289) on September 14, 2009, entitled, “Addressing the Impacts of Climate Change on America’s Water, Land, and Other Natural and Cultural Resources.” That Order established a Climate Change Response Council, chaired by the Secretary, which is coordinating activities within and across the bureaus to develop and implement an integrated strategy for climate change response by the Department. Working at the landscape, regional, and national scales through the establishment of DOI Climate Science Centers (CSCs) and Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs), the Department is defining and implementing a vision that integrates DOI science and management expertise with that of our partners, providing information and best management practices available to support strategic adaptation and mitigation efforts on both public and private lands across the U.S. and internationally.