Subscribe to RSS - Fisheries
Title: 
Graduate Student Assistant
Email Address: 
Title: 
Associate

Location

VT
United States
37° 5' 24.864" N, 95° 42' 46.4076" W
Organization Overview: 

ASAP helps build essential climate resilience for communities across the country by focusing on connecting and supporting the individuals. We provide a platform for climate adaptation leaders to interact, share what’s working, and collaborate with their colleagues.

Adaptation work: 

ASAP Members across the United States are working to prepare for the impacts of climate change and make their communities, regions, states, and the country more resilient to those changes. For each of us, the story is different but similar. ASAP Members realize that climate change is one of the most critical issues of our time and that it will affect many aspects of our jobs and our communities. We work within our own sector and across many other sectors.

Title: 
PhD Candidate

Location

PO Box 757000
99775-7000 Fairbanks, AK
United States
Phone: (907) 474-7412
64° 49' 1.452" N, 147° 52' 45.408" W
Organization Overview: 

The Institute of Arctic Biology was founded in 1963 by the Board of Regents of the University of Alaska with Laurence Irving, a pioneer in the field of comparative physiology, as the founding director.

Adaptation work: 

Adaptation research varies by faculty member, post-doctoral fellow, and graduate student. Several scientists are actively engaged in research that addresses the human dimensions of wildlife, others are involved in decision analysis - a systematic method for making natural resource decisions, and others are investigating changes to the boreal environment and how those changes are affecting human communities.

Email Address: 
Title: 
Climate & Coastal Hazards Specialist

Abstract

Since publishing Seasons’ End: Global Warming’s Threat to Hunting and Fishing, the urgency to address the effects of climate change on fish and wildlife has become increasingly evident. Already waterfowl exhibit changes in seasonal distribution. Higher water temperatures and diminished stream habitat are threatening coldwater fish such as trout and salmon. Big game are shifting to more northerly latitudes and to higher elevations to escape summer heat and find suitable forage.

Abstract

Climate change is the primary long-term challenge facing Oregon’s people, ecosystems, and economies. Immediate action is needed to prepare for and proactively adapt to the consequences of climate change. State-level preparedness will be critical in coping with projected changes such as increased temperatures, rising sea levels and increased storm surges, declining snowpack, more frequent extreme precipitation events, and an increased risk of drought and heat waves. These changes have already created a broad array of secondary effects in Oregon’s ecosystems.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Fisheries