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Location

Gulf of Maine
United States
42° 47' 23.4888" N, 67° 48' 27.4212" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Kathy Mills

Project Summary/Overview

Atlantic salmon populations have declined throughout North America and Europe in recent decades. These declines have exhibited similar patterns over broad geographic areas, and previous studies have shown correlations between salmon declines and changing marine ecosystem conditions. These analyses have specifically identified warming ocean conditions and changes in the prey base as closely linked with Atlantic salmon population trends.

Location

Gulf of Maine
United States
43° 8' 36.8988" N, 68° 22' 44.0616" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Kathy Mills

Project Summary/Overview

This project aims to understand how abrupt temperature changes, as well as the long-term warming trend, impact marine ecosystems and fisheries. Fisheries provide a two-way connection between changing ocean environments and local economies. As the distribution and abundance of species change, where, when, and how many fish are caught will change. Fisheries also respond to economic conditions or management policies, leading to feedbacks onto fish populations.

Location

New England
United States
40° 49' 28.9992" N, 68° 49' 6.0924" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Peg Petruny-Parker

Project Summary/Overview

The goal of the Lobster Research Fleet Pilot Project (also known as the On-Deck Data Program) was to determine the feasibility and value of leveraging the New England lobster fishing community to provide meaningful data on water temperature and species distribution to better inform stock assessments and build a robust dataset.

Location

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
15-21 Nubeena Cres
7053 Taroona
Australia
42° 57' 0.0468" S, 147° 21' 3.4416" E
AU

Project Summary/Overview

The Range Extension Database and Mapping project (Redmap) is a citizen science effort to engage fishermen, divers, and other marine enthusiasts and professionals in monitoring for species range shifts through an online “spot, log, and map” tool. It is also being used as a climate change awareness and education tool with those same constituencies. Originally launched in 2009 for Tasmania, the goal was to harness the observation ability of the estimated 120,000 citizens who went fishing each year.

Location

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
15-21 Nubeena Cres
7053 Taroona
Australia
42° 57' 1.3356" S, 147° 21' 16.5528" E
AU

Project Summary/Overview

The Global Marine Hotspots Network was created because the oceans are not warming evenly and those areas that are warming the fastest – ocean warming ‘hotspots’ – can be considered as the world’s natural laboratories to provide the knowledge and tools to enable us to adapt wisely, efficiently, and effectively to meet the challenges of a warming environment. The Network was designed to better understand the impacts of climate change on commercial fisheries, which support coastal communities and global industries.

Location

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
1401 Constitution Avenue NW Room 5128
20230 Washington, DC
United States
38° 53' 34.5336" N, 77° 1' 57.5652" W
US

Project Summary/Overview

NOAA Fisheries along with stakeholders, fishery management councils, fisheries organizations, and tribes are developing Regional Action Plans (RAPs) to prepare for and respond to climate impacts on marine and coastal resources. The objective of the RAPs is to develop regional implementation guidance of the seven objectives outlined in the 2015 NOAA Fisheries Climate Science Strategy for each region – Alaska, West Coast, Greater Atlantic, Pacific Islands, and Southeast and Caribbean – and to increase the production and use of information to support climate-informed fisheries management.

Location

Northeast Shelf
United States
42° 23' 46.7988" N, 67° 48' 27.4212" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Kathy Mills

Project Summary/Overview

The Northeast Shelf marine ecosystem has experienced substantial changes on seasonal, interannual, and decadal time scales. The abundance, distribution, and biological characteristics of marine fish and invertebrates have been affected by both the direct physical changes as well as by changes in lower trophic levels of the ecosystem. In turn, changes in fish and invertebrate populations have shaped fisheries, affecting the time and location at which fishing occurs as well as the effectiveness of management efforts.

Location

Golden Bay and Tasman Bay
New Zealand
40° 49' 9.7068" S, 173° 10' 48.8532" E
NZ

Project Summary/Overview

Effective species management requires an understanding of species’ response to changing conditions. The Atlantis model, used by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, explores ecosystems to consider impacts of multiple factors. It is currently being used to consider fisheries, climate change, the impacts of pollutants, and habitat damage due to fishing and mining. While Atlantis has been used around the world, this project is focused on effectively modeling the Tasman and Golden Bays region, as well as Chatham Rise.

Location

New England
United States
41° 31' 48.612" N, 67° 40' 32.8116" W
US
Organization: 
Island Institute
Organization: 

Project Summary/Overview

What happens to island and coastal communities in a shifting ocean? This is a question many of Maine’s island and coastal communities are beginning to ask. With changing conditions above and below the ocean, it is important to start identifying these shifts and what coastal communities can do to start preparing. Changes to the natural environment mean new species may start showing up in fishermen’s traps or species that historically were important start disappearing.

Location

Gulf of Maine
United States
43° 12' 8.7228" N, 68° 22' 44.0616" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Kathy Mills

Project Summary/Overview

This NASA-funded project aims to forecast ecological change to support climate-informed management of natural resources in Maine by using NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Rapid climate change documented in Maine is currently challenging management and the sustainability of marine resources. The goal of this project is to develop forecasting models that estimate the distribution of sentinel species in the Gulf of Maine, such as small pelagic fish and squid.

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