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Location

14B Clifton Road
3204 Hamilton
New Zealand
37° 50' 55.7988" S, 175° 6' 39.9024" E

Abstract

Invasive species pose a serious threat to ecosystems, bearing responsibility for half to two-thirds of species extinctions. Worse yet, this problem is exacerbated by climate change, which facilitates the introduction, establishment, and spread of invasive species. One increasingly popular approach to dealing with this issue is ecosystem-based adaptation, which aims to build the resilience of ecosystems against climate change and, through doing so, reduce the threat of invasive species.

Abstract

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service climate change strategy, titled “Rising to the Urgent Challenge: Strategic Plan for Responding to Accelerating Climate Change,” establishes a basic framework within which the Service will work as part of the larger conservation community to help ensure the sustainability of fish, wildlife, plants and habitats in the face of accelerating climate change.

Location

1130 17th St NW
20036 Washington, DC
United States
38° 54' 17.8488" N, 77° 2' 19.3128" W

Location

100 Community Place, 1st Floor MET-Stewardship Program
20132 Crownsville, MD
United States
39° 1' 35.3172" N, 76° 36' 14.868" W

Abstract

This report synthesizes 19 of the 20 CCIAD commissioned research projects, 2007-08, and integrates discussions drawn from the workshop, Understanding Adaptation and Adaptive Capacity, held June 5, 2009, in Ottawa. This report has found a number of common themes and key messages, covering a wide range of sectors, institutions, disciplines, and authors involved in the research projects and workshop discussions.

Location

1250 Twenty-Fourth Street, N.W.
20090 Washington, DC
United States
38° 56' 30.2604" N, 77° 1' 1.5816" W
Organizational Focus / Expertise
Affiliation: 
NGO

Location

United States
40° 48' 17.2836" N, 124° 8' 4.2756" W

Project Summary/Overview

The Northcoast Regional Land Trust (NCRLT) has worked to restore historical tidal flow and native vegetation to the Wood Creek Tidal Marsh. Over the past 150 years, this site has been altered by diking and removal of vegetation and large woody debris. Despite these alterations, surveys have shown that endangered and threatened fish species utilize this area for rearing. The Wood Creek Tidal Marsh Enhancement Project’s primary climate change benefit comes in the form of flood mitigation for the lower Wood Creek/Freshwater Creek area. Anticipated increases in winter precipitation will likely bring increased flooding to the local watersheds. The reconnection of Wood Creek to Freshwater Creek through opening (and eventual removal) of the tidegate and creation of a more complex wetland channel system will expand the flow capacity of the project area, thereby reducing the velocity and shear potential of flood flows.

Abstract

The IPCC Climate Change and Water Technical Paper concluded that observational records and climate projections provide abundant evidence that freshwater resources are vulnerable and have the potential to be strongly impacted by climate change, with wide-ranging consequences for human societies and ecosystems (Bates, Kudzewicz, and Palutikof 2008).

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