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Abstract

From the Executive Summary:

The focus of this document centered on identifying the potential impacts, both positive and negative, to wildlife and their habitats that a changing climate will cause. This was accomplished by conducting a literature review of pertinent climatological and biological research papers and reports; then where possible relating those findings to the habitats and faunal groups of Tennessee.

Abstract

From the Executive Summary:

Clean water is essential to our health, our communities, and our lives. Yet our water infrastructure (drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater systems, dams, and levees) is seriously outdated. In addition, we have degraded much of our essential natural infrastructure (forests, streams, wetlands, and floodplains). Climate change will worsen the situation, as rising temperatures, increased water demands, extended droughts, and intense storms strain our water supplies, flood our communities, and pollute our waterways.

Abstract

Coral reefs in the Nosy Hara Marine Park showed a high coral cover for the WIO, with levels of 34%, and a peak of 53%. Other important cover types were soft corals, being most abundant on outer wave-exposed sites, and macroalgae/cyanobacteria on sheltered inner sites. Overall, terrestrial influence is very high, which is the natural condition in the area, with low visibility levels for coral reefs, shallow reef bases, and evidence of high sediment influence on coral communities and in reef sediments.

Abstract

The purpose of this report ‘The Ocean and Climate Change – Tools and Guidelines for Action’ is to engage, inform and guide decision makers with regard to the development and implementation of marine and coastal climate change strategies and programmes.Despite its enormous importance in regulating global climate and its sensitivity to the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification, the ocean continues to get only peripheral attention in global climate research, climate change policy and implementation plans.

Location

81 STHY 1
04101 Portland , ME
United States
43° 39' 13.9608" N, 70° 15' 44.334" W
Maine US

Project Summary

In 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency selected the Casco Bay Estuary Partnership (CBEP) as one of eight projects to support as part of the Climate Ready Estuaries Program, whose goal is to build local adaptive capacity to climate change. Through a technical assistance grant, CBEP is planning to develop an outreach plan that will target local decision makers and stakeholders and help inform the development of a climate change adaptation plan for the Casco Bay estuary.

Abstract

A joint initiative of the United Nations Foundation and the Club of Madrid, Global Leadership for Climate Action (GLCA) consists of former heads of state and government, as well as leaders in business, government, and civil society from more than 20 countries. In 2007, GLCA published Framework for a Post-2012 Agreement on Climate Change, which called for four negotiating pathways focused on mitigation, adaptation, technology, and finance. This paper focuses more specifically on adaptation and its links to development and poverty alleviation, with emphasis on action at the local level.

Abstract

This report summarizes the science of climate change and the impacts of climate change on the United States, now and in the future. It is largely based on results of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), and integrates those results with related research from around the world. This report discusses climate-related impacts for various societal and environmental sectors and regions across the nation. It is an authoritative scientific report written in plain language, with the goal of better informing public and private decision making at all levels.

Abstract

This review focuses first on types of socioeconomic and biotic adaptations. Many individuals, public agencies, and nongovernmental organizations are discovering ways to protect biodiversity and sustain natural ecological processes. Five case studies are highlighted to illustrate some of these alternative adaptive responses to climatic changes at local and regional scales. These approaches could be modified for use in other locations.

Abstract

In the North Pacific, warming trends, coupled with declining sea ice, raise concerns about the effects of climate change on fish populations and ecosystem dynamics. Scientists are only beginning to understand the potential feedback mechanisms that will affect everything from plankton populations to major commercial fish species distributions, yet fishery managers have a responsibility to prepare for and respond to changing fishing patterns and potential ecosystem effects. There are ways for fishery managers to be proactive while waiting for better information to unfold.

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