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Abstract

The “Florida’s Resilient Coasts: A State Policy Framework for Adaptation to Climate Change” was completed under the leadership of Dr. James Murley, CUES, along with the College of Architecture, Urban and Public Affairs, Florida Altalntic University, and the National Commission on Energy Policy. It was developed due to the state’s lead climate change and the realization that Florida is extremely vulnerable to climate change impacts, especially sea level rise, extreme weathers, severe droughts, and periods of extreme rainfall events.

Abstract

During recent years, drought has become a common occurrence in most areas in the Mekong River Delta of the Mekong region, including nine provinces in the Southern Central and Central Highland regions in Viet Nam. The Department of Water Resources, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD), has estimated that between 1 and 1.3 million people (13–17 per cent of the total population) are affected by drought in these provinces and hence are in need of assistance.

Abstract

The croplands, pastures and forests that occupy 60 percent of the Earth’s surface are progressively being exposed to threats from increased climatic variability and, in the longer run, to climate change. Abnormal changes in air temperature and rainfall and resulting increases in frequency and intensity of drought and flood events have long-term implications for the viability of these ecosystems.

Abstract

The Nature Conservancy’s vision for Kimbe Bay is to “Harness traditional and community values to protect and use land and sea resources in ways that maintain the exceptional natural and cultural heritage of the bay”. This will be achieved by working with local communities, governments and other stakeholders to establish a resilient network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), and develop strategies for improved management of marine resources and land use practices. This report focuses on a critical step in this process– designing a resilient network of MPAs for Kimbe Bay.

Abstract

Large-scale coral bleaching events, driven by unusually warm sea temperatures, have now affected every major coral reef ecosystem on the planet (Wilkinson 2004). The effects of coral bleaching are pervasive, and potentially devastating to ecosystems and the people and industries that depend upon them. The frequency and severity of these large-scale disturbances is predicted to increase as temperatures continue to warm under a global regime of climate change.

Abstract

The Great Barrier Reef is internationally renowned as a place of great beauty and ecological significance and is protected as a Marine Park and a World Heritage Area. It is of immense social, economic and cultural value to the people of Australia. While the Great Barrier Reef is recognised as one of the best-managed coral reef systems in the world, climate-related events have already caused significant impacts. Coral bleaching affected over 50% of reefs in both 1998 and 2002, and seabird nesting failures were observed in 2002 and 2005.

Abstract

This paper synthesises much of the current scientific knowledge on coral reef resistance and resilience to bleaching, a possible major effect of climate change. Following a brief overview of coral bleaching and what is meant by resistance and resilience, the paper highlights a variety of resistance and resilience factors and identifies some gaps in knowledge. It continues by providing an overview of some of the tools and strategies we can use to enhance coral reef resilience.

Abstract

A shift in ocean climate during the late 1970s triggered a reorganization of community structure in the Gulf of Alaska ecosystem, as evidenced in changing catch composition on long-term (1953 to 1997) small-mesh trawl surveys. Forage species such as pandalid shrimp and capelin declined because of recruitment failure and predation, and populations have not yet recovered. Total trawl catch biomass declined >5O% and remained low through the 1980s.

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