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Abstract

The Delaware Estuary watershed and its natural resources will face a variety of challenges with climate change. Due to the many unique features of the Estuary, some aspects of changing climate may not be as severe here as in nearby watersheds and estuaries, whereas other changes may be more important. Since 2008, the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary has engaged experts from throughout the region to conduct an assessment of the vulnerabilities and adaptation options for three key resources of the Delaware Estuary: tidal wetlands, drinking water, and bivalve shellfish.

Location

Gulf of Maine
United States
42° 43' 31.1736" N, 67° 53' 43.8288" W
US
Organization: 

Project Summary

Climatic and non-climatic factors are affecting fisheries in the Gulf of Maine. Unfortunately, many fishermen currently rely on a single-species fishery – the American lobster – and do not have the ability to switch from one fishery to another due to allocations and limited permits.

Location

Bering Sea
United States
56° 51' 53.0604" N, 177° 27' 4.2192" W
US

Project Summary

Researchers from the NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, and the University of Washington’s Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, are creating downscaled climate models to estimate future abundance of fish stocks in the Bering Sea. By combining physical oceanography, fisheries science, and climate projections, researchers hope to develop climate and fishing scenarios that can facilitate climate-informed fisheries management in the region.

Location

National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research
41 Market Pl
1010 Auckland
New Zealand
36° 50' 38.922" S, 174° 45' 42.57" E
NZ

Project Summary

New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research is working to increase their ability to better predict climate change, as well as to create decision-making tools to reduce the vulnerability of New Zealand’s economy and environment to that change. For New Zealand, this means paying particular attention to regional atmosphere-ocean systems. One component is the New Zealand Ocean Acidification Observing Network (NZOA-ON).

Location

Gulf of Mexico
United States
25° 13' 4.7532" N, 90° 2' 38.202" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Mitchell Roffer

Project Summary

The project focuses on enhancing the management of multiple important highly migratory pelagic fish species in the Gulf of Mexico and surrounding waters, with particular focus on Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) and other highly migratory tunas and billfishes in the Gulf of Mexico area for spawning and larvae, and the north Atlantic Ocean including the Gulf of Mexico for adult species. Our team developed an innovative spawning habitat model for Atlantic bluefin tuna in the Gulf of Mexico in collaboration with NOAA Fisheries in a previous study.

Location

Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem
United States
41° 3' 25.5276" N, 68° 30' 38.6712" W
US

Project Summary

Given the complex life histories, attributes, and environmental interdependencies of marine fish species, decision makers are in need of scientifically-based information on the relative vulnerability of fish species to expected changes in climatic and oceanic conditions. This project applied the NOAA Fisheries Fish Species Climate Vulnerability Assessment Methodology to examine 82 species within the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem.

Location

Gulf of Maine
United States
42° 47' 23.4888" N, 67° 48' 27.4212" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Kathy Mills

Project Summary

Atlantic salmon populations have declined throughout North America and Europe in recent decades. These declines have exhibited similar patterns over broad geographic areas, and previous studies have shown correlations between salmon declines and changing marine ecosystem conditions. These analyses have specifically identified warming ocean conditions and changes in the prey base as closely linked with Atlantic salmon population trends. The observed ecosystem changes have likely increased the energy requirements of Atlantic salmon and reduced the energy available to them through their prey.

Location

Gulf of Maine
United States
43° 8' 36.8988" N, 68° 22' 44.0616" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Kathy Mills

Project Summary

This project aims to understand how abrupt temperature changes, as well as the long-term warming trend, impact marine ecosystems and fisheries. Fisheries provide a two-way connection between changing ocean environments and local economies. As the distribution and abundance of species change, where, when, and how many fish are caught will change. Fisheries also respond to economic conditions or management policies, leading to feedbacks onto fish populations.

Location

New England
United States
40° 49' 28.9992" N, 68° 49' 6.0924" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Peg Petruny-Parker

Project Summary

The goal of the Lobster Research Fleet Pilot Project (also known as the On-Deck Data Program) was to determine the feasibility and value of leveraging the New England lobster fishing community to provide meaningful data on water temperature and species distribution to better inform stock assessments and build a robust dataset.

Location

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
15-21 Nubeena Cres
7053 Taroona
Australia
42° 57' 0.0468" S, 147° 21' 3.4416" E
AU

Project Summary

The Range Extension Database and Mapping project (Redmap) is a citizen science effort to engage fishermen, divers, and other marine enthusiasts and professionals in monitoring for species range shifts through an online “spot, log, and map” tool. It is also being used as a climate change awareness and education tool with those same constituencies. Originally launched in 2009 for Tasmania, the goal was to harness the observation ability of the estimated 120,000 citizens who went fishing each year.

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