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Abstract

This executive summary developed by the Pacific Islands Regional Climate Assessment (PIRCA) is aimed at assessing the state of knowledge about climate change indicators, impacts, and adaptive capacity of the Hawaiian archipelago and the US-Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI). The PIRCA is a collaborative effort engaging federal, state, and local government agencies, non-government organizations, academia, businesses, and community groups to inform and prioritize their activities in the face of a changing climate.

 

Abstract

This collection of case studies was developed by the Pacific Islands Regional Climate Assessment (PIRCA), and is part of Climate Change and Pacific Islands: Indicators and Impacts, which is being published as one of a series of technical inputs to the National Climate Assessment (NCA) 2013 report. These case studies illustrate current climate impacts and adaptations across the Pacific Islands region.

Abstract

This report developed by the Pacific Islands Regional Climate Assessment (PIRCA) is aimed at assessing the state of knowledge about climate change indicators, impacts, and adaptive capacity of the Hawaiian archipelago and the US-Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI). The PIRCA is a collaborative effort engaging federal, state, and local government agencies, non-government organizations, academia, businesses, and community groups to inform and prioritize their activities in the face of a changing climate.

Abstract

Biophysical principles are presented in this report to help nearshore marine protected area networks achieve fisheries sustainability, biodiversity conservation and ecosystem resilience in the face of climate change.  These principles can be considered rules-of-thumb to help guide decision making.

Abstract

The field of climate change adaptation is in a period of critical transition. The general concepts of adaptation have been well developed over the past decade. Now, practitioners must move from generalities to concrete actions, including implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Abstract

The impacts of climate change will be felt on both a global and local scale. In Whatcom County, Washington, changes in climate and hydrologic regimes will disrupt ecosystems, communities, and key elements of our economy. In response, the Whatcom County community should protect our valuable forest, water, and related natural resources from climate change risks with local, on-the-ground solutions.

Abstract

In 2010, the Model Forest Policy Program (MFPP), the Cumberland River Compact, and the Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association (NSEA) came together to create a climate adaptation plan for the community of Whatcom County, Washington. It came about because MFPP recognized the critical need for local community resilience against the impacts of climate change by protecting forest and water resources. This climate adaptation plan for Whatcom County, WA presents the results of a year of community team effort, deep and broad information gathering, critical analysis and thoughtful planning.

Location

2445 E. Bakerview Rd.
98226 Bellingham, WA
United States
48° 13' 28.8228" N, 122° 55' 33.69" W
Organization Overview: 

In 1990, the Washington State Legislature created the Regional Fisheries Enhancement Group(RFEG) Program to involve local communities, citizen volunteers, and landowners in the state's salmon recovery efforts.

As one of the 14 RFEGs, NSEA was organized in 1990 as a coalition of community members and partners who work together for restoration of wild salmon runs in Whatcom County, from the Canadian border to the Skagit Watershed.

Adaptation work: 

Education 

We offer field-based environmental education programs for elementary through post-secondary level students and community members focusing on salmon, stream ecology, and stewardship.

Restoration

NSEA has completed over 120 restoration projects on over 15 miles of local streams. These projects address some of the causes of habitat degradation, including lack of stream side vegetation and livestock access.

Email Address: 
Title: 
Associate Project Scientist

Location

United States
44° 18' 5.67" N, 82° 47' 28.0968" W
Author Name(s): 
Abigail Lynch, William W. Taylor

Project Summary/Overview

This research project will make a significant contribution to understanding the biology and production dynamics of the Great Lakes' Lake Whitefish fishery and improve the ability of Great Lakes fishery managers to adapt their behaviors and regulations to be responsive to the impacts of climate change.

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