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Abstract

We report results from an oyster hatchery on the Oregon coast, where intake waters experienced variable carbonate chemistry (aragonite saturation state < 0.8 to > 3.2; pH < 7.6 to > 8.2) in the early summer of 2009. Both larval production and midstage growth (∼ 120 to ∼ 150 µm) of the oyster Crassostrea gigas were significantly negatively correlated with the aragonite saturation state of waters in which larval oysters were spawned and reared for the first 48 h of life.

Abstract

This chapter reviews the physical and ecological impacts of climate change relevant to marine and inland capture fisheries and aquaculture. It is noted that the oceans are warming but that this warming is not geographically homogeneous. The combined effect of temperature and salinity changes due to climate warming are expected to reduce the density of the surface ocean, increase vertical stratification and change surface mixing. There is evidence that inland waters are also warming, with differential impacts on river run off.

Abstract

Global climate change is impacting and will continue to impact marine and estuarine fish and fisheries. Data trends show global climate change effects ranging from increased oxygen consumption rates in fishes, to changes in foraging and migrational patterns in polar seas, to fish community changes in bleached tropical coral reefs. Projections of future conditions portend further impacts on the distribution and abundance of fishes associated with relatively small temperature changes.

Abstract

A statistical model is developed to link recruitment of eastern Bering Sea walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) to variability in late summer sea surface temperatures and to the biomass of major predators. The model is based on recent advances in the understanding of pollock recruitment, which suggest that warm spring conditions enhance the survival of early larvae, but high temperatures in late summer and autumn are associated with poor feeding conditions for young-of-year pollock and reduced recruitment in the following year.

Abstract

Marine life is being affected by changes in ocean conditions resulting from changes in climate and chemistry triggered by combustion of fossil fuels. Shifting spatial distributions of fish species is a major observed and predicted impact of these oceanographic changes, and such shifts may modify fish community structure considerably in particular locations and regions. We projected future range shifts of pelagic marine fishes of the Northeast Pacific shelf seas by 2050 relative to the present.

Abstract

Three independent modeling methods—a nutrient-phytoplankton–zooplankton (NPZ) model (NEMURO), a food web model (Ecopath/Ecosim), and a bioenergetics model for pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha)—were linked to examine the relationship between seasonal zooplankton dynamics and annual food web productive potential for Pacific salmon feeding and growing in the Alaskan subarctic gyre ecosystem.

Abstract

There is growing recognition that the Arctic is threatened by multiple human impacts including climate change and increased activities resulting from greater access due to retreating sea ice. Arctic sea ice cover has declined about 3% per decade over the satellite record (1979-present), with the six lowest annual sea ice minima occurring in the last 6 years (2007-12). The Alaska Arctic contains large petroleum reserves, and human activities related to energy extraction are expected to increase in the near future.

Location

VT
United States
37° 5' 24.864" N, 95° 42' 46.4076" W
Vermont US
Organization Overview: 

ASAP helps build essential climate resilience for communities across the country by focusing on connecting and supporting the individuals. We provide a platform for climate adaptation leaders to interact, share what’s working, and collaborate with their colleagues.

Adaptation work: 

ASAP Members across the United States are working to prepare for the impacts of climate change and make their communities, regions, states, and the country more resilient to those changes. For each of us, the story is different but similar. ASAP Members realize that climate change is one of the most critical issues of our time and that it will affect many aspects of our jobs and our communities. We work within our own sector and across many other sectors.

Abstract

A recent NOAA study found that by 2040, Alaskan shellfish hatcheries may no longer be sustainable because of ocean acidification, unless serious mitigation efforts are put in place. We recently reported on a hatchery in Oregon that’s become a model for adapting to these different conditions. But the long term solution may actually lie in shellfish genes. Evolution and resiliency are the buzzwords for a sustainable mariculture industry in Alaska, a state that is particularly vulnerable.

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