Subscribe to RSS - Fisheries

Abstract

This paper is a compilation of information on impacts of climate change on Caribbean fisheries and adaptation approaches to these impacts. It also incorporates discussions and recommendations from the “Consultation on Adaptation of Fisheries and Fishing Communities to the Impacts of Climate Change in the CARICOM Region”, held in Tobago, April 14-15, 2002.

Abstract

Climate change became real for many Americans in 2012 when a record heat wave affected much of the United States, and Superstorm Sandy pounded the Northeast. At the same time, a less visible heat wave was occurring over a large portion of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Like the heat wave on land, the ocean heat wave affected coastal ecosystems and economies. Marine species responded to warmer temperatures by shifting their geographic distribution and seasonal cycles.

Abstract

The goal of this NOAA Fisheries Climate Science Strategy (Strategy) is to increase the production, delivery, and use of climate-related information required to fulfill NOAA Fisheries mandates. Although the information needed to understand, prepare for, and respond to climate change impacts on LMRs is diverse, this Strategy identifies seven common objectives to efficiently and effectively meet these information requirements. The seven objectives are:

Abstract

In late July 2013, the Island Institute hosted a workshop with approximately 110 fishermen, scientists, managers, policy makers, non-governmental organizations, and others in Portland, Maine. The goal—to discuss the latest science of climate change and the ocean, as well as changes fishermen are seeing at sea. The workshop focused on improving our collective understanding of how climate change is impacting New England fisheries and fishermen.

Abstract

Fish population variability and fisheries activities are closely linked to weather and climate dynamics. While weather at sea directly affects fishing, environmental variability determines the distribution, migration, and abundance of fish. Fishery science grew up during the last century by integrating knowledge from oceanography, fish biology, marine ecology, and fish population dynamics, largely focused on the great Northern Hemisphere fisheries. During this period, understanding and explaining interannual fish recruitment variability became a major focus for fisheries oceanographers.

Abstract

Evidence of the impacts of anthropogenic climate change on marine ecosystems is accumulating, but must be evaluated in the context of the “normal” climate cycles and variability which have caused fluctuations in fisheries throughout human history. The impacts on fisheries are due to a variety of direct and indirect effects of a number of physical and chemical factors, which include temperature, winds, vertical mixing, salinity, oxygen, pH and others.

Abstract

Cumulative human pressure on the Earth’s systems is changing both terrestrial and marine systems in significant ways – shifts in temperature, water levels, winds, extreme events and associated changes in habitat, flora and fauna. For industries, such as fisheries, and societies to remain viable despite the change they will need to adapt to it, as they have adapted to many other changes through time. There are wide range of research projects into the mechanisms that assist or hinder adaptation.

Abstract

In Alaska, the fishing industry has advantages in adapting to climate-related change, but is vulnerable in ways that some other regions are not. This publication explains the effects of climate change on fisheries in Alaska and worldwide, and suggests ways in which Alaska’s fishermen and fishing-dependent communities can adapt. It also defines adaptation and related terms, and summarizes the state of knowledge on fisheries adaptations worldwide.

Abstract

Decision-makers in fisheries management are confronted with the challenge of how to respond to existing and predicted changes in ocean conditions that are likely to affect the stocks of fish they manage. In order to address climate change most research and thinking advises decision-makers to ensure that fisheries are well-managed and abundant in an ecosystem context. These policies can best allow fisheries to adapt to changing climate. To address climate change, decision-makers should carefully monitor changing conditions and potential changes in factors affecting fish stock abundance.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Fisheries