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Title: 
Executive Administrator
Organization: 

Abstract

The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe initiated a pilot study to assess the impacts of anticipated climate changes to both tribal infrastructure and the Sauk river ecosystem that supports fish and wildlife critical to the tribe. The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe’s homeland encompasses a broad area including the Sauk and Cascade River watersheds in northwestern Washington. The Sauk River is a large meandering alluvial river that flows north into the Skagit River. Sauk River Miles (RM) start at its confluence with the Skagit.

Location

United States
52° 50' 22.8876" N, 1° 34' 55.3116" E
US

Project Summary

In the United Kingdom, shoreline management plans (SMPs) provide the framework for coastal regulatory officials to assess long-term changes and risks associated with coastal processes, such as tidal patterns, wave height, and sea level rise. These plans provide strategies to help reduce risks associated with coastal flooding and erosion on built and natural environments. Like most marine management plans, SMPs are non-statutory. Instead, they are high-level policy documents that take into account existing legislative requirements and compatibility with adjacent coastal areas.

Location

United States
44° 8' 2.1408" N, 68° 23' 43.386" W
US

Project Summary

Maine’s Coastal Sand Dune Rules recognize uncertainty around rates of erosion and sea level rise, but also the need to act despite uncertainty. The rules define erosion hazard areas as any section of the coastal dune system that may become part of a coastal wetland over the next 100 years due to cumulative changes resulting from (1) historic long-term erosion, (2) short-term erosion from a 100-year storm, or (3) flooding during a 100-year storm combined with a two-foot rise in sea level.

Location

United States
51° 42' 18.4284" N, 1° 19' 6.0924" E
US

Project Summary

The United Kingdom established the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009, requiring the development of marine plans under the guidance of the Marine Management Organization. Approximately eleven plans will be developed for the sustainable development of various uses and activities in ocean regions around England by 2021.

Location

United States
41° 44' 49.8264" N, 70° 20' 43.6524" W
US
Organization: 

Project Summary

The Cape Cod Commission, established in 1990, is charged with furthering conservation, balanced economic growth, water quality protection, provision of adequate capital facilities, development of adequate fair affordable housing, and preservation of coastal resources and historical, cultural, archaeological, architectural, and recreational values. The Commission adopted a Regional Policy Plan in 1991 to guide land use throughout the county; the plan is reviewed and amended as needed at least every five years.

Location

United States
40° 57' 56.8332" N, 72° 10' 58.5192" W
US

Project Summary

East Hampton, on Long Island, New York, is both a vacation destination and home to a strong year-round community with its early economic roots in agriculture, fishing, and shellfishing. Development pressure and population growth has caused some degradation of coastal resources, and in 1999 the Town enacted a Local Waterfront Revitalization Program (LWRP) to protect and promote waterfront resources.

Location

United States
41° 57' 27.7308" N, 70° 21' 23.202" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Katie Thompson, Mallory Morgan

Project Summary

The original Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (MOMP) was adopted on December 21, 2009, as Massachusetts’s official framework to facilitate the sustainable use of the state’s ocean waters, protect critical marine habitat and uses, and set standards for new ocean-based development. The MOMP was implemented within existing regulatory structure, and requires a review and update at least once every five years by the relevant agencies.

Abstract

The Working Group II contribution to the AR5 (WGII AR5) has 30 chapters, a Technical Summary, and a Summary for Policymakers. The WGII AR5 considers the vulnerability and exposure of human and natural systems, the observed impacts and future risks of climate change, and the potential for and limits to adaptation. The chapters of the report assess risks and opportunities for societies, economies, and ecosystems around the world.

Abstract

We have known about the perils of climate change for more than two decades. But global efforts to slow it down by reducing greenhouse-gas emissions have largely failed. Even if we could stop producing greenhouse gases tomorrow, the high concentration of carbon dioxide already in the atmosphere will cause the climate to continue to change. As a result we must not only intensify our efforts to reduce climate change but start preparing for its inevitable effects.

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