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Abstract

On February 2, 2005, Governor Janet Napolitano signed Executive Order 2005-02 establishing the Climate Change Advisory Group (CCAG). Appointed by the Governor, the 35-member CCAG comprised a diverse group of stakeholders who brought broad perspective and expertise to the topic of climate change in Arizona.

Abstract

The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)model was used to assess the effects of potential future climate change on the hydrology of the Upper Mississippi River Basin(UMRB). Calibration and validation of SWAT were performed using monthly stream flows for 1968-1987 and 1988-1997,respectively. The R2 and Nash-Sutcliffe simulation efficiency values computed for the monthly comparisons were 0.74 and 0.69 for the calibration period and 0.82 and 0.81 for the validation period.

Abstract

The Regional Municipality Planning Strategy (this Plan) is a guide for the future development of the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM). It represents a significant step forward in integrated land use planning and long-term coordination. It is a framework that outlines how future sustainable growth should take place in the HRM, in a way that preserves the environment while at the same time maintaining a strong economy.

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to provide residents and stakeholders with the information necessary to make an informed decision regarding the best solution for the community of Kivalina. The current state of the community is discussed in detail in this report, as are each of the alternatives.

Abstract

This report is intended for elected municipal officials and senior staff. It outlines decision-making processes to adapt to climate change and showcases municipal adaptation measures implemented across the country. The goal is to help municipal governments make informed decisions and take appropriate action. For those municipalities that are already developing adaptation measures, this document can help enhance an understanding of climate change adaptation among elected officials, staff and the broader community.

Abstract

Environmental and societal factors such as air quality, water quality and availability, land use changes and expanding urbanization are already affecting human health and welfare, agriculture, and natural ecosystems in the Midwestern United States. Over this century, these existing stresses will likely be exacerbated by climate changes resulting from human activities. It is essential that policy decisions aimed at preserving the well-being of a region be informed by a good understanding of the region’s climate, how climate might change, and the uncertainties inherent in future projections.

Abstract

Local observations and scientific studies suggest that climate change could have serious consequences for Nunavut. Impacts ranging from changes in sea ice distribution and abundance to melting permafrost could affect the health and well-being of our people.

The Government of Nunavut has identified the following key climate change priority areas for Nunavut:

  1. Advancing climate change knowledge
  2. Building community capacity for adaptation
  3. Measurement and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions

Abstract

The National Park Service (NPS) manages nearly 12,000 kilometers (7,500 miles) of shorelines along oceans and the Great Lakes. In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with the NPS Geologic Resources Division, began conducting hazard assessments and creating map products (fig. 1) to assist the NPS in managing vulnerable coastal resources.

Abstract

Increasing concentrations of CO2 and other gases seem likely to warm the earth in the next century. The article examines opportunities to prepare for the consequences, focussing on options that are rational even if one is skeptical about global warming. Some responses can be postponed. But many low-cost opportunities will slip away if we fail to act; and reaching a consensus on what is fair is easier when the consequences seem remote. It concludes that some changes in land use and water allocation should be implemented today, even if effective dates are several decades in the future.

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