Subscribe to RSS - Landscape Architecture
Email Address: 
Position Title: 
Climate-Smart Cities Program Manager, Green Infrastructure

Abstract

The tool (framework) is intended to help managers deal with one aspect of historic preservation planning efforts: evaluating and assessing the relative historical significance and use potential of historic buildings. In this publication we (1) present an overview of the process we used to develop the measurement framework and (2) describe how the framework can be used as a guide for measuring the historical significance and use potential of buildings.

Abstract

The primary purpose of this Strategy is to outline specific sub-strategies and recommendations to fulfill the stated adaptation goal and associated objectives (explained in Section 2). The overarching public purpose of the Strategy is to reduce the impacts of climate change through effective risk management. The Strategy is intended as a proactive approach in response to the findings of the vulnerability assessment conducted for the Metro-Boston Region.

Location

US Fish & Wildlife Service
620 S. Walker St
47403 Bloomington , IN
United States
39° 9' 38.6784" N, 86° 32' 45.9132" W
Indiana US

Project Summary

The Midwest and the Mississippi Alluvial Valley currently contribute the greatest nutrient load to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone. Modifying the design or shifting the location of conservation practices can provide benefits for wildlife, water quality, energy and agriculture, making program dollars go farther and appeal to more land managers.

Abstract

Climate change poses some of the most significant risks for the preservation of coastal cultural resources or cultural heritage. As a result, more research is needed to facilitate the design and implementation of feasible and transparent adaptation strategies for cultural resources under changing climate conditions. In this paper, we begin to explore the challenges and opportunities that face cultural resource managers as they begin to grapple with climate change adaptation planning in dynamic coastal environments.

Abstract

Since 1988, EPA’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) has established itself as an important source of affordable funding for infrastructure projects that improve and maintain the quality of our nation’s waters. Each of the 51 programs operating independently across the United States and Puerto Rico demonstrate the power of federal and state partnerships to leverage financial resources in the interest of building sustainable infrastructure and protecting public health and water quality.

National Stormwater Calculator

Tool Overview: 

The EPA Stormwater Calculator (SWC) is a desktop tool that can be used by individuals looking to reduce stormwater runoff at the local level. The SWC generates rainfall runoff volume and frequency estimates for any location in the United States or Puerto Rico using historic rainfall data, local soil properties, and land use cover inputs. Users can manipulate the land use category and evaluate how seven different green infrastructure methods can alter runoff volume and frequency on their property.

Drought Management Database

Tool Overview: 

The Drought Management Database collects and provides examples of how different U.S. regions and sectors are responding to and mitigating drought. This online database can be useful for various levels of government looking to engage in drought preparedness and response planning, as well as for sectoral decision makers looking to undertake similar planning efforts, as it provides real-world examples and lessons learned.

Coastal County Snapshots

Tool Overview: 

Coastal County Snapshots is an online tool that produces user-friendly reports identifying and describing three categories of coastal hazards and change — flooding risk, wetland impacts, and ocean jobs impact — for selected coastal counties in the United States. Users select a coastal county, and the tool generates reports for the three categories identifying and describing changes that have occurred (e.g., changes in land cover, job trends) and important sectoral information (e.g., amount of coastal infrastructure at risk from flooding, how wetlands can be used to reduce flood impacts).

Tool Description: 

Land managers, natural resource managers, local authorities, planners, engineers, scientists, community members

Climate Change and Water: Resources and Tools Page

Tool Overview: 

The EPA’s Climate Change and Water: Resources and Tools page provides information and links to various resources, data sources, and tools to facilitate climate-informed water management. Information is categorized into the following groups: infrastructure, watersheds and wetlands, coastal and ocean waters, water quality, tribal, climate change and water science and research, data and tools, and for kids and educators.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Landscape Architecture