The Monaco Ocean Acidification Plan

This Action Plan was developed by the Ocean Acidification international Reference User Group (OAiRUG), with representatives from both the scientific and research users communities. The Plan aims to share progress and set priorities for developments in science and policy to keep pace with impacts we are starting to see in ecosystems and economic sectors most vulnerable to ocean acidification. This plan is as much for governments, policy advisers and decision makers, as it is for new stakeholders and the existing ocean acidification experts who form the current ‘ocean acidi cation community’. Whilst this plan is not comprehensive, it highlights major achievements and is intended to take stock of scientific and political activities, whilst also fostering a broader debate on priorities for action in the coming decade. 

Identifying and Reducing Climate Risks to Water Resources in an Eastern Virginia Water Utility

Location

VA
United States
37° 5' 54.8088" N, 76° 29' 2.652" W
Virginia US
Summary: 

Newport News Waterworks is a water provider for several cities and counties in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain of Eastern Virginia near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. Climate change is projected to cause issues for local water supply and quality. The utility has worked on a number of impacts studies, capital improvement projects, and water conservation outreach efforts to help improve its activities in light of a changing climate.

Sierra Climate Adaptation and Mitigation Partnership (Sierra CAMP)

Location

Sierra Nevada
United States
37° 5' 1.2912" N, 119° 7' 1.5924" W
US
Organization: 
Sierra Business Council, Alliance of Regional Collaboratives for Climate Adaptation
Summary: 

Sierra CAMP is a public-private, cross-sector partnership working to promote climate adaptation and mitigation strategies across the Sierra Nevada region.

Position Title: 
Innovative Services Manager
Organization: 

A measurement framework to increase transparency in historic preservation decision-making under changing climate conditions

Today, cultural heritage planning and decision-making operate under considerable climate, political, and financial uncertainties and constraints. Consequently, decision-makers are often left making value-laden judgments of what to preserve, restore, and maintain in their best judgments, which can leave them open to criticism for not protecting the cultural resources most important to various and diverse stakeholder groups. Thus, a transparent and robust process to optimally maintain cultural heritage values for present and future generations is needed. We address this knowledge gap by developing a novel, transparent, and value-based measurement framework for assessing relative “historical significance” and “use potential” of diverse historic buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places (United States). Measures of historical significance include: the association of a building with the purpose of a NPS site's foundation, the current physical condition of a building, the building's historic character, and National Register listing criteria. Specific measures of use potential consider the importance of historic building's operational, third party, visitor, interpretative, and scientific uses. The application of the framework is presented using a subset of buildings located within two separately listed historic districts at Cape Lookout National Seashore, North Carolina. The framework focuses on the current status of the cultural resource's significance and use potential while acknowledging that corresponding attributes, metrics and weights can change over time and should be regularly updated. It is hoped that the historical significance and use potential framework can assist the decision-makers and stakeholders, and better inform both the cultural heritage management and allocation prioritization for climate adaptation planning when it is applied in tandem with climate change vulnerability assessments.

Email Address: 
Position Title: 
Environmental Program Manager

weADAPT

Tool Overview: 

weADAPT is an online ‘open space’ on climate adaptation issues (including the synergies between adaptation and mitigation) which allows practitioners, researchers and policy makers to access credible, high quality information and to share experiences and lessons learnt with the weADAPT community. It is designed to facilitate learning, exchange, collaboration and knowledge integration to build a professional community of research and practice on adaptation issues while developing policy-relevant tools and guidance for adaptation planning and decision-making.

Coastal Land Loss and the Mitigation-Adaptation Dilemma: Between Scylla and Charybdis

Coastal land loss is an inevitable consequence of the confluence of three primary factors: population growth, vanishing wetlands, and rising sea levels. Society may either mitigate coastal land loss by engaging in human engineering projects that create technological solutions or restore natural processes that protect the coastal zone, or it may choose to adapt to coastal land loss by shifting development and other human and economic resources out of areas especially at risk for coastal land loss. This Article first details the primary threats to coastal lands. Next, the Article discusses two primary means of addressing coastal land loss— mitigation and adaptation—applying those terms slightly differently than they are used in the broader climate change context in order to focus more precisely on the coastal land loss phenomena and its solutions. Finally, the Article makes three normative claims for why policy-makers should approach coastal land loss mitigation in particular with caution: (1) uncertainty of mitigation’s effectiveness scientifically and institutionally; (2) the political expediency of choosing mitigation over adaptation; and (3) the fact that failure to adapt past land-use activities in the coastal zone has contributed to the need to adapt or mitigate today.

Position Title: 
Climate Technician