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Abstract

This assessment was prepared over the past five years by an international team of over 300 scientists, other experts, and knowledgeable members of the indigenous communities. The lead authors were selected from open nominations provided by AMAP, CAFF, IASC, the Indigenous Peoples Secretariat, the Assessment Steering Committee, and several national and international scientific organizations.

Abstract

Local observations and scientific studies suggest that climate change could have serious consequences for Nunavut. Impacts ranging from changes in sea ice distribution and abundance to melting permafrost could affect the health and well-being of our people.

The Government of Nunavut has identified the following key climate change priority areas for Nunavut:

  1. Advancing climate change knowledge
  2. Building community capacity for adaptation
  3. Measurement and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions

Abstract

As we stand at the beginning of the new millennium, the threats to nature and protected areas are unprecedented. While some progress has been made and strategies such as protected areas have been successful in preserving biodiversity in some places, new threats are arising.

Abstract

Aim: Conservation strategies currently include little consideration of climate change. Insights about the biotic impacts of climate change from biogeography and palaeoecology, therefore, have the potential to provide significant improvements in the effectiveness of conservation planning. We suggest a collaboration involving biogeography, ecology and applied conservation.

Abstract

Advice to Government on linkages between biodiversity and climate change was prepared by Landcare Research, Lincoln, for the Ministry for the Environment in June – August 2001.

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