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Abstract

In the past few years there has been a remarkable increase in the level of awareness of climate change worldwide. Concerns about causes and effects have moved beyond the realm of scientific debate to the offices of legislators and the conference rooms of city planners, and even to the living rooms of people everywhere. As evidence accumulates that a warming planet will cause widespread and mostly harmful effects, scientists and policy makers have proposed various mitigation strategies that might reduce the rate of climate change.

Abstract

Canada’s municipalities are increasingly facing the realities of climate change impacts, none more so than northern communities. Early understanding of local climate change impacts and a pro-active approach to reducing the community’s vulnerabilities to them is essential to build a more resilient community.

Abstract

PlaNYC is New York City's climate change strategy. All of PlaNYC's strategies - from reducing the number of cars to building cleaner, more efficient power plants to addressing inefficiencies in buildings - will contribute to their long term emissions reductions target. In addition, it outlines a plan to embark on a long term planning effort to develop a climate change adaptation strategy, to prepare New York City for the climate shifts that are already unavoidable.

Abstract

The City of Sydney Environmental Management Plan establishes the City’s environmental vision, goals, targets and actions for the next ten years and beyond. It addresses the themes of energy and emissions, water, waste, plants and animals. Prioritised actions have been developed to improve the health and function of our environment, and reduce environmental impacts of Council and our community. Actions will be delivered through demonstration, advocacy and partnerships to position the City as a leading environmental city.

Abstract

Why a HRM Climate SMART Community Guide to Climate Change? One of the greatest challenges facing the world is from global climate change. In 2003 and 2004, Nova Scotians and we in HRM experienced several extreme weather events - an ice storm, torrential rains and flooding, Hurricane Juan, and the Blizzard of ‘04 (also known as White Juan).

Abstract

This article identifies social justice dilemmas associated with the necessity to adapt to climate change, examines how they are currently addressed by the climate change regime, and proposes solutions to overcome prevailing gaps and ambiguities. We argue that the key justice dilemmas of adaptation include responsibility for climate change impacts, the level and burden sharing of assistance to vulnerable countries for adaptation distribution of assistance between recipient countries and adaptation measures, and fair participation in planning and making decisions on adaptation.

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