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Abstract

The Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural Resource Science (ACCCNRS or the Committee) advises the Secretary of the Interior on the operations and partnerships of the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) and Climate Science Centers (CSCs). The Committee commends the United States (U.S.) Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) on the est

Abstract

Trout and salmon populations, which play a critical role in many ecosystems and economies, have dramatically declined in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) due to habitat degradation and fragmentation and introductions of invasive species, and are expected to be further impacted by future climate change. Understanding how climate change will influence the abundance, distribution, genetic diversity, and value of these native fish species is crucial for their management and recovery.

Abstract

Climate change is altering species distributions in unpredictable ways (IPPC 2007, Van der Putten et al. 2010) and conservationists require a way to prioritize strategic land conservation that will conserve the maximum amount of biological diversity despite changing distribution patterns. Conservation approaches based on species locations or on predicted species’ responses to climate, are necessary, but hampered by uncertainty.

Abstract

Land trusts have an important role to play in addressing climate change. Some conservation organizations are already involved in protecting forests that sequester carbon dioxide, offsetting harmful greenhouse gases. Others promote more compact development patterns, which help reduce CO2 emissions. But most land trusts protect land for a variety of reasons that typically have more to do with recreation, biodiversity, view sheds, water quality or cultural values.

Abstract

This vulnerability assessment is a science-based effort to identify how and why focal resources (habitats, species, and ecosystem services) across the North-central California coast and ocean region are likely to be affected by future climate conditions. The goal of this assessment is to provide expert-driven, scientifically sound assessments to enable marine resource managers to respond to, plan, and manage for the impacts of climate change to habitats, species, and ecosystem services within the region.

Abstract

This report summarizes and communicates the results of EPA’s ongoing Climate Change Impacts and Risk Analysis (CIRA) project.

Abstract

Federal agencies with responsibility for natural resource management are mandated to consider climate change in planning and projects, and to begin preparing for the effects of climate change. Federal agencies are making significant progress in climate change adaptation, although lack of financial resources has slowed implementation of climate-focused activities. Currently, most agencies have broad-scale strategic plans that describe approaches and priorities for climate change in general and for adaptation in particular.

Location

St. Louis
United States
38° 37' 37.2108" N, 90° 11' 57.8544" W
US
Organization Overview: 

Metro St. Louis Coalition for Inclusion and Equity (M-SLICE) advocates for inclusive and equitable public policies, and the allocation of public and private investments to transition traditionally underserved communities into healthy and vibrant places to live, work, and play throughout Metro St. Louis. Since inception, our work has focused on the Northside of St. Louis to address disparities of environmental justice and climate equity, the unbanked and underbanked, Community Reinvestment Act, civic engagement, and equitable community and economic development practices.

Abstract

The San Juan Bay (Puerto Rico) National Estuary Program used EPA’s publication, “Being Prepared for Climate Change: A Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans” to create a risk-based climate change vulnerability assessment. This video describes some climate change impacts that are already affecting San Juan, documents why the San Juan Bay National Estuary Program undertook this vulnerability assessment project, and explains the benefits of conducting the study.

Abstract

The need for municipalities, regional planning organizations, the state and federal agencies to increase resilience and adapt to extreme weather events and mounting natural hazards is strikingly evident along the coast of Connecticut. Recent events such as Tropical Storm Irene, the Halloween Snow Storm, and Storm Sandy have reinforced this urgency and compelled leading communities like the Town of Madison to proactively plan and mitigate potential risks through a community-driven process.

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