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Abstract

Forests in northern Michigan will be affected directly and indirectly by a changing climate during the next 100 years. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of forest ecosystems in Michigan's eastern Upper Peninsula and northern Lower Peninsula to a range of future climates. Information on current forest conditions, observed climate trends, projected climate changes, and impacts to forest ecosystems was considered in order to draw conclusions on climate change vulnerability.

Abstract

Recent research indicates increasing openness among conservation experts toward a set of previously controversial proposals for biodiversity protection. These include actions such as assisted migration, and the application of climate-change-informed triage principles for decision-making (e.g., forgoing attention to target species deemed no longer viable). Little is known however, about the levels of expert agreement across different conservation adaptation actions, or the preferences that may come to shape policy recommendations.

Abstract

Preparing for change requires individuals, institutions, and sectors to work together. Climate change adaptation action on the ground and across all levels of decision making within the marine biodiversity and resources sector should be guided by the most recent adaptation science, research and practice. A series of high level guiding principles have been drafted (this document). They reflect the knowledge and expertise of researchers, resource managers, policy makers and resource users with direct experience in developing or applying adaptation knowledge.

Abstract

The evidence of coral reef vulnerability and the predictions of climate change underpin the Great Barrier Reef Outlook Report 2009 conclusion that climate change is the dominant threat to the future of the Reef. This document outlines our strategy to address these challenges, and sets out our plan for action over the next five years. It builds on the strong foundations laid by our pioneering work under the Great Barrier Reef Climate Change Action Plan (2007–2012).

Location

25 Horner St.
20186 Warrenton , VA
United States
37° 30' 35.0136" N, 77° 7' 26.4828" W
Virginia US
Organization Overview: 

Rainforest Trust is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization established in 1988 to save rainforests and other threatened tropical habitats that are critical for preventing imminent species extinction. Celebrating 24 years of lasting conservation action, we are proud to say that with support from generous people like you, Rainforest Trust has saved over 7 million REAL acres in REAL places across 17 countries and 67 sites. Please join us in saving threatened rainforest forever.

Abstract

The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in Arizona, working with the USDA Forest Service, TNC-New Mexico, University of Arizona, and Wildlife Conservation Society, convened a two-day workshop entitled Climate Change Adaptation Workshop for Natural Resource Managers in the Four Forest Restoration Initiative area on 7-8 April 2010 in Flagstaff, Arizona (See Appendix B, page 50 for the agenda). Forty-four representatives of 15 state and federal agencies, local governments and non- governmental organizations participated (See Appendix A, page 48 for the list of participants).

Abstract

The Executive Order directs Federal agencies to take a series of steps to make it easier for American communities to strengthen their resilience to extreme weather and prepare for other impacts of climate change.

Abstract

The emerging field of climate change adaptation has experienced a dramatic increase in attention as the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and ecosystems have become more evident. Preparing for and addressing these changes are now prominent themes in conservation and natural resource policy and practice. Adaptation increasingly is viewed as a way of managing change, rather than just maintaining existing conditions.

Abstract

Ecosystems around the world are already threatened by land-use and land-cover change, extraction of natural resources, biological disturbances, and pollution. These environmental stressors have been the primary source of ecosystem degradation to date, and climate change is now exacerbating some of their effects. Ecosystems already under stress are likely to have more rapid and acute reactions to climate change; it is therefore useful to understand how multiple stresses will interact, especially as the magnitude of climate change increases.

Climate Change Tree Atlas

Tool Overview: 

As the reality of global climate change becomes increasingly apparent to the public and to many policymakers, scientists are being called on to provide information about possible outcomes. Dr. Louis Iverson and Anantha Prasad began modelling and mapping tree species from the eastern United States for their potential response to several scenarios of climate change around 1996.

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