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Location

32168 New Smyrna Beach, FL
United States
29° 1' 32.9484" N, 80° 55' 37.1928" W
Author Name(s): 
Margo Schwadron

Project Summary/Overview

Canaveral National Seashore contains several of the largest, most intact, and most significant prehistoric shell mounds in North America. Four of these mounds are threatened by erosion induced by sea level rise and increased storm activities.

Location

United States
47° 58' 32.8404" N, 124° 39' 57.546" W
Author Name(s): 
Dave Conca
Organization: 

Project Summary/Overview

Archeological sites and traditional resources of significance to indigenous groups along the Olympic Coast are being affected by climate change. The goals of this project can be split into three facets. The first is for the park to foster communication, data sharing, and cooperation between the eight federally listed tribes on the Olympic Peninsula and the National Park Service (NPS) to ensure proper alignment of resources and priorities for climate change adaptation.

Location

TX
United States
31° 58' 6.9564" N, 99° 54' 6.5268" W
Author Name(s): 
Jack G. Johnson, Brenda K. Todd

Project Summary/Overview

Amistad National Recreation Area, Texas, protects many archeological sites in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands region of southwest Texas. Sites are affected by lake level fluctuations related to climate change impacts including precipitation, storms, and changes in agricultural water use. Park managers are documenting the impact of changing water levels on the cultural resources in the park. 

Abstract

The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) aims to improve the ability of coastal communities to reduce risks from sea level rise and coastal storms through the use of natural infrastructure and nature-based measures.

Pending moderation

Location

Connecicut
55 Church Street
06510 New Haven, CT
United States
41° 18' 17.4168" N, 72° 55' 34.1868" W
Organization: 

Project Summary/Overview

The Salt Marsh Advancement Zone Assessment for Connecticut report is the culmination of a statewide study of each of the 24 coastal municipalities in Connecticut. At the municipal scale, these 24 individual reports inform communities about future marsh advancement locations, current land use of those affected properties, and which parcels are critical to the persistence of the community’s salt marshes.

Abstract

This report assesses how the Great Plains social-ecological system has been shaped by changing climate conditions and how future projections of climate change will result in a need for further adaptation and preparedness. This effort is part of the 2014 United States Global Change Research Program National Climate Assessment as required by the United States Congress.

Location

United States
47° 5' 0.6252" N, 122° 42' 35.0352" W

Project Summary/Overview

The Nisqually Delta Restoration Project is the largest tidal marsh restoration effort in the Pacific Northwest. Over four miles of dikes were removed in 2009 to return tidal flow to roughly 762 acres in the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge in Washington State to enhance wildlife habitat and the buffering capacity of marshes to sea level rise and increased flooding. Along with other local restoration efforts, 22 miles of the historic delta system have been restored, increasing salt marsh habitat in southern Puget Sound by over 50 percent.

Abstract

This Citizen’s Guide is intended to serve as an introduction to the vast amount of information available on topics related to climate change effects on the Oregon coast, as well as a sourcebook for citizens interested in helping their communities to begin the long process of adapting to these effects. In publishing the Guide, the Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition anticipates that most readers will access and read it online with Internet access or in an electronic format, such as a PDF, which will enable easy access to additional information.

The Guide has two parts:

Abstract

The U.S. Geological Survey is examining effects of future sea-level rise on the coastal landscape from Maine to Virginia by producing spatially explicit, probabilistic predictions using sea-level projections, vertical land movement rates (due to isostacy), elevation data, and land-cover data.

Abstract

This report highlights progress made in 2014 implementing the National Action Plan and describes the specific tasks that federal agencies are planning to undertake in 2015. It also builds on a previous report published in 2014 which described progress in 2013 and plans for 2014.

Pages

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