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Abstract

Communities across the country want to protect their water quality while also getting the greatest possible benefit out of every investment they make. Many are conserving, restoring, or enhancing natural areas while incorporating trees, rain gardens, vegetated roofs, and other practices that mimic natural systems into developed areas to manage rainwater where it falls.

Abstract

Amid growing evidence that climate change is having wide-ranging global impacts that will worsen in the years ahead, Insurer Climate Risk Disclosure Survey Report & Scorecard: 2014 Findings & Recommendations, ranks the nation's 330 largest insurance companies on what they are saying and doing to respond to escalating climate risks. The report found strong leadership among fewer than a dozen companies but generally poor responses among the vast majority.

Lake Level Viewer: United States Great Lakes

Location

United States
45° 2' 44.0988" N, 82° 31' 45.4692" W
Who should use your tool?: 
Tool Description: 

This tool helps users visualize lake level changes that range from six feet above to six feet below historical long-term average water levels in the Great Lakes, along with potential shoreline and coastal impacts. Communities can use this information to determine what preparations make the most sense in planning for water level change scenarios. Preparations might include zoning restrictions, infrastructure improvements, and habitat conservation. Information obtained from this tool also provides a good lead-in for community discussions about climate change.

Features

  • Helps users visualize impacts of increased and decreased water levels
  • Displays information about the certainty of water extent
  • Allows investigation of water depth
  • Correlates socioeconomic data with lake level change
  • Provides direct access to data and services for customized analysis
Type of Tool: 
Visualization
Hazard Simulation / Visualization
Tool Cost: 
Name: 
Phone: 

Sarasota Bay Estuary Sea Level Rise Map Viewer

Location

United States
27° 20' 7.656" N, 82° 32' 18.5784" W
Who should use your tool?: 
Tool Description: 

SBEP and its partners are aware of the potential long term impact of rising sea levels along the coast. Planning for changes to shorelines and the larger impact on the community will become increasingly important in the decades ahead. To support future planning, SBEP has created a Sea Level Rise web map tool that shows various scenarios based on different levels of water due to sea level increases and surges of water from occasional storms.

This pilot project is a collaborative effort of SBEP and Mote Marine Laboratory, with funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Climate Ready Estuaries Program. The areas shaded in blue show lands vulnerable to sea-level rise along the Sarasota Bay Estuary. The visualization tool shows an approximation of potential flooding in Sarasota and Manatee Counties, but not exact locations.

The analysis is based on the mean higher high water level obtained from LiDAR elevation imagery. The LiDAR data has a vertical accuracy of 0.60 feet (at a 95% confidence interval). The LiDAR data does not cover depth of water columns. All cells in the DEM grid below sea-level rise thresholds were designated as inundated regardless of hydrologic connectivity. The water levels shown are the flooding above the mean high tide level, but do not take into account the possibility of erosion, land subsidence, sediment accretion, or future construction. To display the potential flooding in the event of a hurricane driven storm surge, the map also illustrates (in shades of magenta) the extent of a Hurricane Charley-level storm surge for each sea level increase.

Type of Tool: 
Visualization
Tool Cost: 
Free
Name: 
Phone: 

Sea Level Rise Adaptation Primer: A Toolkit to Build Adaptive Capacity on Canada's South Coasts

Location

United States
51° 47' 32.3052" N, 60° 7' 1.8768" W
Profiles in system: 

The Sea Level Rise Adaptation Primer is a resource for coastal management authorities (mainly local governments) to help them identify and evaluate options for adapting to the impacts of sea level rise and associated hazards. The Primer is intended to be relevant for southern coastal regions across Canada with application to British Columbia, Quebec, and the Atlantic region.

Tool Description: 

This Primer provides an introduction to past and future sea levels, an overview of four different adaptation strategies, a recommended framework for decision making and finally a total of 21 adaptation tools to support local adaptation action.

The B.C. Ministry of the Environment commissioned the preparation of this Sea Level Rise Adaptation Primer for Canada’s Atlantic and Pacific coasts. Although this Primer was prepared in B.C., legislative provisions, policies and local government applications discussed in this Primer include B.C., southern Quebec and the Atlantic coasts of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador. Coastal communities along Hudson Bay and in the Arctic face a different set of vulnerabilities and were not considered within the context of this research.

Planning tools in this Primer include local government growth management objectives and policies, mapping of potential coastal hazards, risk management and emergency preparedness.

Regulatory tools include the regulation of subdivision, land use and buildings. These regulatory tools are generally prescribed by legislation and require the approval of a decisionmaker or “gatekeeper” responsible for the protection of the public interest.

Land use change or restriction tools focus on the change or restriction of land use other than through the regulatory functions noted above. Some of these tools are at the disposal of local government and others may be undertaken by private landowners or community groups in order to achieve local government goals.

Structural tools consist of physical structures on land or in water to protect land and buildings from coastal hazards. A wide range of hard protection and armouring fit in this category.

Non-structural or soft armouring measures include the creation or restoration of wetlands, building sand dunes, or rehabilitation and beach nourishment. Both sand dunes and beaches are naturally occurring features, created by the interaction of wind, waves and sediment. They serve to dissipate the energy of storm surges and wave action. These natural features can be mimicked or recreated to provide an adaptive buffer to sea level rise.

Type of Tool: 
Adaptation Planning / Decision Support
Adaptation Planning Frameworks / Toolkits

Abstract

Washington, D.C. is likely to see record flooding by 2040 under a mid-range sea level rise scenario. A low-range scenario leads to a better-than-even chance by 2030 of flooding more than 6 feet above the local high tide line – a level topped just once in the last 70 years. And under high-range projections, there is a near certain chance of flooding above 10 feet by end of century – the highest level incorporated into our analysis.

Abstract

This report describes the results of an initial study to advance policies and practices in British Columbia, and elsewhere, with regard to the use of “soft” shore armouring alternatives within the context of climate change, sea level rise (SLR) practices and guidelines and flood protection. The study was initiated by the Stewardship Centre for British Columbia, with the support of Natural Resources Canada.

Abstract

The Climate Change in Colorado report is a synthesis of climate science relevant for management and planning for Colorado’s water resources. It focuses on observed climate trends, climate modeling, and projections of temperature, precipitation, snowpack, and streamflow. The 2014 report is a thorough revision and expansion of the 2008 report of the same name, also produced by WWA in partnership with the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB).

Abstract

Knowledge and Action gives an insight into what eight cities in India and the Philippines are doing to tackle the impacts of climate change. It covers key topics affecting many cities across Asia and beyond, including flooding, soil erosion and pollution of fresh ground water supplies with salt water.Developing cities are particularly vulnerable to climate change, with many already feeling the impacts of rising sea levels, biodiversity collapse and increasing temperatures due to urban heat islands.

Location

United States
32° 45' 0.8496" N, 79° 54' 8.8668" W
Author Name(s): 
Blaik Keppler, Greg Hoffman, Sadie Drescher, April Turner, Katie Ellis

Project Summary/Overview

The Low Impact Development (LID) Manual for Coastal South Carolina project is supported by years of outreach and research led by the South Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERRS) and South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium. The project includes key leaders in the area that serve on the LID Manual Advisory Committee, and incorporates public trainings/meetings throughout the process. The final product will be a guidance document defined and vetted by end users.

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