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Coastal Flood Exposure Mapper

Tool Overview: 

The Coastal Flood Exposure Mapper helps communities understand their risks and vulnerability to coastal flooding. The mapper was first developed following Hurricane Sandy to provide a tool to show areas susceptible to coastal flooding, storm surge, and inundation, and to inform communities and local authorities about the risks their communities face. Users are able to explore maps that show how natural resources, communities, and infrastructure and development will be exposed to coastal flooding hazards.

Coastal County Snapshots

Tool Overview: 

Coastal County Snapshots is an online tool that produces user-friendly reports identifying and describing three categories of coastal hazards and change — flooding risk, wetland impacts, and ocean jobs impact — for selected coastal counties in the United States. Users select a coastal county, and the tool generates reports for the three categories identifying and describing changes that have occurred (e.g., changes in land cover, job trends) and important sectoral information (e.g., amount of coastal infrastructure at risk from flooding, how wetlands can be used to reduce flood impacts).

Tool Description: 

Land managers, natural resource managers, local authorities, planners, engineers, scientists, community members

Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service

Tool Overview: 

The Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) provides a variety of forecasts from the National Weather Service regarding potential magnitude and uncertainty of flood and drought events. The AHPS offers hydrologic forecasts for close to 4,000 locations throughout the United States, and forecasts can be produced from hours to months in advance. The tool mainly draws upon data from the USGS National Streamflow Information Program (https://water.usgs.gov/nsip), a national network of stream gauges.

Location

Alameda County, California CA
United States
37° 45' 53.9892" N, 122° 13' 20.9532" W
California US
Organization: 
Four Twenty Seven
Organization: 

Project Summary

Cities across the United States face the challenge of integrating climate change considerations into their planning. Climate data is complex and fragmented, and often presented in a format and scale that are not aligned with planners’ needs. To support the integration of climate change adaptation into relevant plans such as local hazard mitigation plans, Four Twenty Seven, a California-based climate risk consulting firm, worked with the Alameda County waste authority to develop:

Abstract

 

The Earth’s climate is changing – wetter winters and drier summers will affect existing buildings and alter the requirements of new ones. Whatever the cause of climate change, we will need to adapt our buildings so that they can cope with higher temperatures, more extreme weather and changes in rainfall.

Abstract

On a narrow promontory extending far out into the Chukchi Sea, the village of Point Hope enjoys one of the nest locations in Alaska for the harvest of subsistence resources, including sh, marine mammals, birds and caribou. This amazing place has allowed the Inupiat of Point Hope to ourish for centuries, and it is one of the oldest continuously occupied communities in Alaska. But it is also one of the most exposed, vulnerable to the full force of coastal storms and the constant shaping of the land by the wind and the sea.

Abstract

The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe initiated a pilot study to assess the impacts of anticipated climate changes to both tribal infrastructure and the Sauk river ecosystem that supports fish and wildlife critical to the tribe. The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe’s homeland encompasses a broad area including the Sauk and Cascade River watersheds in northwestern Washington. The Sauk River is a large meandering alluvial river that flows north into the Skagit River. Sauk River Miles (RM) start at its confluence with the Skagit.

Location

United States
52° 50' 22.8876" N, 1° 34' 55.3116" E
US

Project Summary

In the United Kingdom, shoreline management plans (SMPs) provide the framework for coastal regulatory officials to assess long-term changes and risks associated with coastal processes, such as tidal patterns, wave height, and sea level rise. These plans provide strategies to help reduce risks associated with coastal flooding and erosion on built and natural environments. Like most marine management plans, SMPs are non-statutory. Instead, they are high-level policy documents that take into account existing legislative requirements and compatibility with adjacent coastal areas.

Location

United States
40° 57' 56.8332" N, 72° 10' 58.5192" W
US

Project Summary

East Hampton, on Long Island, New York, is both a vacation destination and home to a strong year-round community with its early economic roots in agriculture, fishing, and shellfishing. Development pressure and population growth has caused some degradation of coastal resources, and in 1999 the Town enacted a Local Waterfront Revitalization Program (LWRP) to protect and promote waterfront resources.

Abstract

Coastal and marine spatial planning (CMSP) is a science-based, collaborative process used to sustainably manage resources, interests, and activities among diverse coastal and ocean users and sectors. Climate change is affecting marine and coastal ecosystems throughout the world, manifesting in warming air and sea temperatures, increasing coastal storms, and rising sea levels. The existing and projected impacts of climate change and ocean acidification need to be incorporated into planning processes to ensure long-term success.

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