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Sea Level Rise Adaptation Primer: A Toolkit to Build Adaptive Capacity on Canada's South Coasts

Location

United States
51° 47' 32.3052" N, 60° 7' 1.8768" W
US
Tool Overview: 

The Sea Level Rise Adaptation Primer is a resource for coastal management authorities (mainly local governments) to help them identify and evaluate options for adapting to the impacts of sea level rise and associated hazards. The Primer is intended to be relevant for southern coastal regions across Canada with application to British Columbia, Quebec, and the Atlantic region.

Tool Description: 

This Primer provides an introduction to past and future sea levels, an overview of four different adaptation strategies, a recommended framework for decision making and finally a total of 21 adaptation tools to support local adaptation action.

Abstract

Washington, D.C. is likely to see record flooding by 2040 under a mid-range sea level rise scenario. A low-range scenario leads to a better-than-even chance by 2030 of flooding more than 6 feet above the local high tide line – a level topped just once in the last 70 years. And under high-range projections, there is a near certain chance of flooding above 10 feet by end of century – the highest level incorporated into our analysis.

Abstract

This report describes the results of an initial study to advance policies and practices in British Columbia, and elsewhere, with regard to the use of “soft” shore armouring alternatives within the context of climate change, sea level rise (SLR) practices and guidelines and flood protection. The study was initiated by the Stewardship Centre for British Columbia, with the support of Natural Resources Canada.

Abstract

The Climate Change in Colorado report is a synthesis of climate science relevant for management and planning for Colorado’s water resources. It focuses on observed climate trends, climate modeling, and projections of temperature, precipitation, snowpack, and streamflow. The 2014 report is a thorough revision and expansion of the 2008 report of the same name, also produced by WWA in partnership with the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB).

Abstract

Knowledge and Action gives an insight into what eight cities in India and the Philippines are doing to tackle the impacts of climate change. It covers key topics affecting many cities across Asia and beyond, including flooding, soil erosion and pollution of fresh ground water supplies with salt water.Developing cities are particularly vulnerable to climate change, with many already feeling the impacts of rising sea levels, biodiversity collapse and increasing temperatures due to urban heat islands.

Location

United States
32° 45' 0.8496" N, 79° 54' 8.8668" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Blaik Keppler, Greg Hoffman, Sadie Drescher, April Turner, Katie Ellis

Project Summary

The Low Impact Development (LID) Manual for Coastal South Carolina project is supported by years of outreach and research led by the South Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERRS) and South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium. The project includes key leaders in the area that serve on the LID Manual Advisory Committee, and incorporates public trainings/meetings throughout the process. The final product will be a guidance document defined and vetted by end users.

Abstract

This report is the second in The Boston Harbor Association (TBHA)’s Preparing for the Rising Tide series. TBHA both times partnered with recognized content experts—in this case Sasaki Associates—to offer policy recommendations to help Boston prepare for increased coastal flooding. 

Preparing for the Rising Tide (2013) provided an initial assessment of Boston’s vulnerability to coastal flooding due to storm surges and sea level rise.  The report also described how to do a basic site-specific vulnerability assessment and a time-phased preparedness plan. 

Abstract

In 2008, Oxfam GB in Pakistan undertook community-based research to better understand the implications of climate change for communities living in the Badin coastal region of Pakistan. This research was initiated following discussions between programme staff and partners about the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) 2007 reports, as well as the UNDP Human Development report of the same year. This case study is an analysis of a pilot climate change adaptation project designed by Oxfam GB in response to the research.

Abstract

Bangladesh is one of the most climate vulnerable countries in the world and will become even more so as a result of climate change. Floods, tropical cyclones, storm surges and droughts are likely to become more frequent and severe in the coming years. These changes will threaten the significant achievements Bangladesh has made over the last 20 years in increasing incomes and reducing poverty, and will make it more difficult to achieve the MDGs.

Abstract

The Technical Paper addresses the issue of freshwater. Sealevel rise is dealt with only insofar as it can lead to impacts on freshwater in coastal areas and beyond. Climate, freshwater, biophysical and socio-economic systems are interconnected in complex ways. Hence, a change in any one of these can induce a change in any other. Freshwater-related issues are critical in determining key regional and sectoral vulnerabilities. Therefore, the relationship between climate change and freshwater resources is of primary concern to human society and also has implications for all living species.

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