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Location

United States
37° 26' 9.5532" N, 122° 10' 39.7596" W

Project Summary/Overview

Communities along the San Francisquito Creek are facing flooding risks from increased storm events and sea level rise. The San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority is leading four main projects to stabilize, restore, and maintain the channel of the San Francisquito Creek. They are also working with upstream partners within the entire watershed, extending from San Francisco to El Camino Real, to design and plan capital projects to increase flood protection that benefit the natural environment.

Abstract

The following “Guiding Principles” embrace those concepts and values that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) “believes in” and will apply to the development of policies and strategies to guide our actions and recommendations pertaining to the management of Maryland’s rivers and streams. These Guiding Principles provide a science-based perspective on rivers and streams intended to help DNR’s Environmental Review Unit effectively evaluate and consistently formulate sound recommendations on proposed projects that could adversely impact these important aquatic resources.

Abstract

Our Changing Climate 2012 highlights important new insights and data, using probabilistic and detailed climate projections and refined topographic, demographic and land use information. The findings include:

Abstract

This report focuses on the economic impacts caused by polluted urban runoff, also known as “stormwater,” a significantly growing source of water pollution in the United States. It’s not intended to be an academic or technical document, but instead to be an “easy to read” compendium of current experiences, analysis and knowledge. Our goal is to provide something useful for municipal and utility officials, local, state and national elected representatives, and the general public.

Abstract

All around us, the chorus of voices calling for renewed investment in our nation’s critical water infrastructure is growing. Yet while the calls amplify, harmony remains elusive.There is widespread agreement that our water systems desperately need investment if they are to sustain the critical services they provide to economies. As to how those systems should perform, how we should pay for them and how we should value them—there, unanimity dissolves.

Abstract

Kirsten Howard and Allie Goldstein, recent graduates of the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan, spent three months traveling around the United States collecting 'stories of climate resilience'--examples of people and places adapting to the impacts of climate change. They visited 31 states and conducted 158 interviews with natural resource managers, climate scientists, farmers, city planners, business owners, artists, and more. This is the 7-minute version of their summer.

The Carbon Map

Tool Summary / Overview: 

This website uses an animated, distorted, shaded, interactive map to help convey how different countries fit into the climate change picture – both the causes and the risks. It was created as an entry for the World Bank’s Apps for Climate competition.

Abstract

This document was developed by Delaware’s Sea Level Rise Advisory Committee and by staff of the Delaware Coastal Programs section of the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC). It is intended to assist government agencies, businesses and individuals make well-informed choices about preparing for and responding to sea level rise. Its central component is a set of recommendations for building the state’s ability to adapt to sea level rise.

Abstract

The Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a comprehensive assessment of the physical science basis of climate change. It builds upon the Working Group I contribution to the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report in 2007 and incorporates subsequent new findings from the Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation, as well as from research published in the extensive scientific and technical literature.

Location

United States
50° 1' 28.434" N, 114° 55' 24.708" W

Project Summary/Overview

Grizzly bears, moose, mountain goats, deer, elk—all call Elkford, British Columbia home. Wild at Heart is the community slogan and the area is known as the wilderness capitol of British Columbia. As a Rocky Mountain town, the local economy is dependent on the surrounding natural resources—coal mining, logging and increasingly, tourism. How does a community that values it wilderness, wildlife, and depends on the natural resources adapt to climate change? By finding solutions that are in sync with community values.

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