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Abstract

Overview:

Please join us for the second in a webinar series co-hosted by EcoAdapt and the Sustainable Remediation Forum (SURF) examining climate change and resilience within remediation of contaminated lands. This webinar will feature highlights of the programs being implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State Of Massachusetts. We will also discuss progress in SURF’s 2016 research initiative on this timely topic.

Presenters:

Carlos Pachon, USEPA

Abstract

PUBLIC WORKS - STORM WATER

The Storm Water Utility Division manages and controls the amount of effluents which are discharged into the City's storm water system. This division is responsible for maintaining storm water lines; installing catchment filter basins to reduce and eliminate polluted storm water run-off; complying with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit requirements; and relieving flooding conditions.

Storm Water Management Master Plan

Abstract

Oakland is one of the most diverse, creative and progressive urban coastal cities in the United States.

Abstract

Gulf South Rising was a regional movement of coordinated actions and events to highlight the impact of the global climate crisis on the Gulf South region. Through collaborative events and actions around strategic dates in 2015, Gulf South Rising demanded a just transition away from extractive industries, discriminatory policies, and unjust practices that hinder equitable recovery from disaster and impede the development of sustainable communities.

This year-long initiative

Abstract

This webinar is offered as part of the National Adaptation Forum Webinar series and hosted by U.S. Sustainable Remediation Forum (http://www.sustainableremediation.org/), EcoAdapt, and the Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (CAKEx.org). It will feature highlights of the recent Sustainable Remediation Forum (SURF) conference on Climate Change and Resilience within Remediation, including a comprehensive overview of challenges and opportunities, with a focus on the legal and insurance implications.

Canadian Extreme Water Level Adaptation Tool (CAN-EWLAT)

Location

Bedford Institute of Oceanography
1 Challenger Drive P.O. Box 1006
B2Y 4A2 Dartmouth
Canada
CA
Tool Overview: 

Extreme water level along the marine coastline is a result of a combination of storm surge, tides, and ocean waves. Future projections of climate change in the marine environment indicate that rising sea level and declining sea ice will cause changes in extreme water levels, which will impact Canada's coastlines and the infrastructure in these areas. Understanding these changes is essential for developing adaptation strategies that can minimize the harmful effects that may result.

Location

Panaji , GA
India
15° 29' 27.348" N, 73° 49' 40.26" E
Goa IN

Project Summary

Coastal areas face multiple risks related to climate change and variability. The Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report identified several highly urbanized, low-lying deltas of Asia and Africa as particularly vulnerable to climate-related impacts.

Abstract

Pursuant to Executive Orders No. 13514 and 13653, as well as Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Implementing Instructions, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) is required to submit a Climate Adaptation Plan. DOT’s work on climate adaptation began with the understanding that climate impacts will affect DOT’s strategic goals of safety, state of good repair and environmental sustainability. This plan is an update from the 2012 DOT Climate Adaptation Plan, which includes the new requirements of E.O. 13653 and guidance from CEQ.

Abstract

CCVA Report - Part 1 presents the results of "climate stress test" on the city of Cambridge, MA.  The vulnerability assessment focuses on risks related to rising tempertures and greater precipitation.  The science-based assessment was conducted in an interdisciplinary manner with extensive communitya stakeholder engagement.

Abstract

In his Climate Action Plan, President Barack Obama acknowledged the risks of climate change to families, businesses, infrastructure, and water supplies across the country. To help metro areas manage these risks, the president pledged to reduce flood damage by raising flood elevation standards for federally funded infrastructure projects, to support community resilience through existing federal grant programs, and to make climate change information more accessible, among other actions.

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