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Abstract

The National Climate Assessment assesses the science of climate change and its impacts across the United States, now and throughout this century. It documents climate change related impacts and responses for various sectors and regions, with the goal of better informing public and private decision-making at all levels.

Location

United States
44° 5' 41.82" N, 123° 55' 32.8116" W
US

Project Summary

Climate change impacts such as increased mean temperatures, increased frequency and intensity of storms, sea level rise, and changes in precipitation are predicted to impact coastal Oregon. To help decision-makers, legislators, and the public plan for and adapt to the likely impacts of climate change, the Oregon Coastal Management Program created an adaptation strategy in 2009. The overall goal of the strategy is to provide a framework for coordinated action across jurisdictions and to help local coastal governments prepare adaptation plans by 2015.

Abstract

According to the NRC and the USGCRP, changes in the earth's climate--including higher temperatures, changes in precipitation, rising sea levels, and increases in the severity and frequency of severe weather events--are under way and expected to grow more severe over time. These impacts present significant risks to the nation's energy infrastructure.

Abstract

The extent to which ecosystem services have been considered in the National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs) and the proposed adaptation projects is assessed. By August 2010, 44 least developed countries had prepared their NAPAs in response to climate change. The NAPAs constitute a starting point for planning adaptation nationally and sub-nationally, but need to be evaluated and improved as new knowledge emerges.

Abstract

Coastal Resilience 2.0 is a suite of interactive tools to help decision-makers assess risk and identify nature-based solutions to reduce socio-economic vulnerability to coastal hazards. The tools allow users to interactively examine storm surge, sea level rise, natural resources, and economic assets and to develop risk reduction and restoration solutions in an easy-to-use web-based map interface.

Location

United States
34° 5' 9.7044" N, 118° 12' 46.4076" W
US

Project Summary

Over the next century, sea level rise in the Los Angeles region is expected to match global projections with an increase of 0.1 - 0.6 m (5 - 24 inches) from 2000 to 2050 and 0.4 - 1.7 m (17 - 66 inches) from 2000 to 2100. Tides, wave-driven runup, and storm surge sometimes cause coastal flooding in Southern California, especially when big wave storms occur at or near peak high tides.

Abstract

The City of Los Angeles (City of L.A. or the City) has initiated research to support planning for the impacts of climate change. The City, the University of Southern California Sea Grant Program (USC Sea Grant) and project partners developed a science-based and stakeholder-supported adaptation planning process to support research on the impacts of sea level rise on City assets, resources and communities.

Abstract

The Oahu Metropolitan Planning Organization (OahuMPO) was selected by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) as one of five pilots nationwide to perform and evaluate a risk assessment of climate change on important transportation assets. The conceptual model shown below defines a method of integrating an inventory of assets with climate information and determining how vulnerable the asset is from two dimensions: the impact to the asset itself and, importantly, the socioeconomic consequences of that impact.

Abstract

On November 15, 2012, Governor Andrew Cuomo convened the NYS 2100 Commission in response to the recent, and unprecedented, severe weather events experienced by New York State and the surrounding region: most recently, Superstorm Sandy, Hurricane Irene, and Tropical Storm Lee. The Governor asked the Commission to examine and evaluate key vulnerabilities in the State’s critical infrastructure systems, and to recommend actions that should be taken to strengthen and improve the resilience of those systems.

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