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Abstract

As with the original ClimAID assessment, New York State was divided into seven regions for this update. The geographic regions are grouped together based on a variety of factors, including type of climate and ecosystems, watersheds, and dominant types of agricultural and economic activities.

Location

United States
47° 15' 12.1788" N, 122° 31' 10.3116" W

Project Summary/Overview

In 2010, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) selected five pilot teams from across the country to test a climate change vulnerability assessment model. This conceptual model guided transportation agencies through the process of collecting and integrating climate and asset data in order to identify critical vulnerabilities.

Location

United States
21° 32' 42.8496" N, 158° 6' 54.8424" W

Project Summary/Overview

In 2010, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) selected five pilot teams from across the country to test a climate change vulnerability assessment model. This conceptual model guided transportation agencies through the process of collecting and integrating climate and asset data in order to identify critical vulnerabilities.

Regional Aquatic Prioritization and Mapping Tool

Location

United States
45° 30' 33.948" N, 116° 48' 23.9076" W
Tool Description: 

This tool was designed as a web interface to solve the question, "Given a set of constraints, which sub-basins should I focus on to maximize conservation objectives for specified fish species." Typically, solving these problems, compiling the data and analyzing it, is prohibitively complex and too time-consuming for the majority of potential users. We have created a suite of GIS datasets coupled with a back-end decision support model, packaged within this web-based tool to facilitate iterative and collaborative exploration of regional aquatic priorities.

NPLCC Priorities Tool

Location

United States
47° 11' 44.4588" N, 123° 23' 54.3768" W
Tool Description: 

The Priorities Tool is a watershed visualization and priorities decision support system for the North Pacific LCC developed by Ecotrust.

This spatially explicit, online tool is intended to assist the North Pacific LCC and other natural resource managers, individuals, and community organizations in accessing disparate data sources for understanding and visualizing a wide variety of data sets pertaining to species, threats and potential effects of climate change on freshwater and forest ecosystems throughout the North Pacific LCC geographic area.

Pending moderation

Location

300 E University Blvd Suite 270
85705 Tucson, AZ
United States
32° 13' 53.2956" N, 110° 58' 0.1056" W

Project Summary/Overview

Springs are keystone ecosystems in the Sky Island Region, exert disproportionate influence on surrounding landscapes, and are known to be biodiversity hotspots. Although they are abundant in this arid region, they are poorly documented and little studied. They also suffer from extensive human modification and are among the most threatened ecosystems. Lack of information on their location, management context, and biological, hydrological, and ecological characteristics hinders effective stewardship of these resources.

Abstract

The Underlying goal for the Springs Ecosystems Working Group and Adaptation Action Plan is to maintain
and improve spring integrity.

The primary mechanisms for achieving this goal were identified to be:

Abstract

Sky Island Alliance is currently conducting a project to inventory, assess, and restore spring ecosystems in the Sky Island region. It is known that springs in arid regions occupy a small fraction of the landscape and yet support disproportionately high levels of productivity, endemism, and biodiversity. The need for inventory, assessment, and restoration of springs was raised at two regional climate change adaptation workshops convened and organized by Sky Island Alliance in collaboration with a variety of partners including federal and state land and wildlife management agencies.

Abstract

The presentation was part of the workshop, Bridging Boundaries: Climate Change Adaptation Workshop for Resources Managers, held on October 4, 2012 at the YMCA in Estes Park, CO and co-organized by the US Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station and scientists at Colorado State University and the University of Arizona.

Abstract

Communities across the country want to protect their water quality while also getting the greatest possible benefit out of every investment they make. Many are conserving, restoring, or enhancing natural areas while incorporating trees, rain gardens, vegetated roofs, and other practices that mimic natural systems into developed areas to manage rainwater where it falls.

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