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Abstract

Fish and Wildlife agencies across the United States are currently revising their State Wildlife Action Plans (SWAPs). These documents are important planning documents over 10 year timescales. SWAP Coordinators have been challenged to incorporate climate change impacts and species responses as part of their strategic approaches to managing vulnerable fish and wildlife resources.

Location

United States
5° 9' 23.7564" S, 42° 32' 20.6268" W

Project Summary/Overview

Drylands display a close human-nature interdependence based on their particularly marginal natural resources. The pronounced constraints on ecosystem functioning and human livelihoods in drylands are frequently exacerbated by natural and socio-economic stresses, including weather extremes and inequitable trade conditions. Therefore, a better understanding of the relation between these stresses and the socio-ecological systems is important for advancing dryland development. Vulnerability is employed as a concept to link the socio-ecological systems and stress factors that impact upon them.

Location

PE
Canada
46° 22' 0.5916" N, 62° 52' 29.1216" W

Project Summary/Overview

Black ash trees are found throughout much of southeastern Canada and play important cultural and economic roles in the lives of First Nation communities. Unfortunately, black ash populations are rapidly disappearing due to anthropogenic impacts and other stressors. In response, many First Nations in the Northern Appalachian/Acadian eco-region are working to preserve and restore black ash tree populations. 

Abstract

Like most Arctic communities, Cambridge Bay is already experiencing the effects of climate change, and there are further changes projected. Both temperature and precipitation are projected to rise steadily over time, with the most significant increases occurring during the fall and winter seasons. Further concerns relate to the possibility of increases in climate variability and extreme events.

Abstract

The community of Clyde River has prepared this plan to better prepare for changes that have started or might happen as a result of climate change. It is understood that this is a first step in a long journey to help the community adjust to climate change. Future steps will be based on new research, knowledge and experience obtained by the community. The plan includes three parts: the desired results [goals], the methods that will be used to achieve the desired results [strategies] and the specific steps that will be taken [an action plan]. 

Abstract

This report assesses how the Great Plains social-ecological system has been shaped by changing climate conditions and how future projections of climate change will result in a need for further adaptation and preparedness. This effort is part of the 2014 United States Global Change Research Program National Climate Assessment as required by the United States Congress.

Location

United States
47° 5' 0.6252" N, 122° 42' 35.0352" W

Project Summary/Overview

The Nisqually Delta Restoration Project is the largest tidal marsh restoration effort in the Pacific Northwest. Over four miles of dikes were removed in 2009 to return tidal flow to roughly 762 acres in the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge in Washington State to enhance wildlife habitat and the buffering capacity of marshes to sea level rise and increased flooding. Along with other local restoration efforts, 22 miles of the historic delta system have been restored, increasing salt marsh habitat in southern Puget Sound by over 50 percent.

Adapting to Climate Change: A short course for land managers

Location

United States
45° 43' 3.6696" N, 122° 20' 37.5" W
Tool Description: 

Information in this short course summarizes the state-of-the science for natural resource managers and decisionmakers regarding climate variability, change, climate projections, and ecological and management responses to climate variability. The information and talks included were produced from a July 2008 workshop at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest that brought together key U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Geological Survey scientists, and a select group of pioneering resource managers who served as reviewers and discussants.

Presentations cover:

Abstract

This Citizen’s Guide is intended to serve as an introduction to the vast amount of information available on topics related to climate change effects on the Oregon coast, as well as a sourcebook for citizens interested in helping their communities to begin the long process of adapting to these effects. In publishing the Guide, the Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition anticipates that most readers will access and read it online with Internet access or in an electronic format, such as a PDF, which will enable easy access to additional information.

The Guide has two parts:

Abstract

This project seeks to evaluate the success and degree of implementation of the Climate Change Action Plan for the Florida Reef System 2010-2015 (referenced hereafter as Action Plan, and cited as CCAPFRS). This Action Plan identifies interdisciplinary actions to be incorporated into reef management plans in order to address a myriad of climatic and non-climatic stressors to the reef system, minimize risks to coral reef dependent people and industries, and target scientific research priorities for strategic management.

Pages

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