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USGS Derived Downscaled Climate Projection Portal

Profiles: 

This web portal allows visualization and downloading of future climate projections from a group of "statistically downscaled" global climate models (GCMs). Temperature and precipitation projections from these models have been used to calculate derivative climate indicators that measure the number of days that exceed certain thresholds.

Who should use your tool?: 

Users can map a variety of variables such as days above or below certain temperatures and precipitation amounts. In addition, projections can be plotted by county, ecoregion, watershed, state, or Landscape Conservation Cooperative.

Type of Tool: 
Modeling and Analysis
Downscaled Climate Models
Visualization
Tool Cost: 
Free

Abstract

On November 15, 2012, Governor Andrew Cuomo convened the NYS 2100 Commission in response to the recent, and unprecedented, severe weather events experienced by New York State and the surrounding region: most recently, Superstorm Sandy, Hurricane Irene, and Tropical Storm Lee. The Governor asked the Commission to examine and evaluate key vulnerabilities in the State’s critical infrastructure systems, and to recommend actions that should be taken to strengthen and improve the resilience of those systems.

Abstract

The case of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe exemplifies tribal vulnerabilities as a result of climate change. Preliminary socio-economic data and analysis reveal that the tribe’s vulnerability to climate change is related to cultural and economic dependence on Pyramid Lake, while external socio-economic vulnerability factors influence adaptive capacity and amplify potential impacts.

Abstract

The importance of farming in MarylandAgriculture is the largest commercial industry in Maryland, employing about 350,000 people, on almost 13,000 farms covering two million acres.What is changing?Over the past century, both minimum and maximum temperatures have been increasing. In the future, Maryland should expect higher temperatures, more intense precipitation in the fall and winter, and an increase in short-term droughts in the summer. The two most active farming regions in Maryland are also two of the most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

Abstract

Your woods are always changing and adapting as they grow and mature, or regrow after agricultural abandonment, natural disturbances, or harvesting activities. Events like storms, droughts, insect and disease outbreaks, or other stressors can damage trees or slow their growth. A changing climate may make your woods more susceptible to the problems these events can cause.Step 1. Learn more about your woodsStep 2. Contact a foresterStep 3. Identify your goals & objectivesStep 4. Develop and implement a forest stewardship plan

Abstract

Kirsten Howard and Allie Goldstein, recent graduates of the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan, spent three months traveling around the United States collecting 'stories of climate resilience'--examples of people and places adapting to the impacts of climate change. They visited 31 states and conducted 158 interviews with natural resource managers, climate scientists, farmers, city planners, business owners, artists, and more. This is the 7-minute version of their summer.

Abstract

The Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a comprehensive assessment of the physical science basis of climate change. It builds upon the Working Group I contribution to the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report in 2007 and incorporates subsequent new findings from the Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation, as well as from research published in the extensive scientific and technical literature.

Abstract

Human induced climate change is driving rapid biophysical changes throughout the oceans and seas that cover over two-thirds of the Earth’s surface. The most widely discussed effect of climate change in the marine and coastal environment is sea level rise, and the transformation of coastal geography poses a profound climate adaptation challenge in the longer term. Accompanying sea level rise are other more immediate climate change impacts upon coastal and marine areas.

Location

United States
64° 42' 36.2124" N, 158° 9' 33.048" W

Project Summary/Overview

Koyukon Elders of Alaska’s Interior observe that “cold weather is growing old” and recent warming is contributing to a world out of balance. Alaska is among the most rapidly warming places globally, with the Interior experiencing the most pronounced warming statewide, and with significant regional-scale ecosystem services disruptions affecting subsistence hunting and harvest success. Vulnerability of individuals, households, and communities to climate change is exacerbated by rising energy costs and a regulatory system that constrains the adaptive flexibility needed to cope with impacts on livelihoods. Socioeconomic and cultural change notwithstanding, the well-being of rural native communities is still dependent on access and ability to harvest wild foods, with moose the example explored in this study. In the fall of 2004, there was a convergence during the moose hunting season of warming climatic conditions with social, political, and ecological events and conditions that affected the ability of subsistence hunters in the region to successfully harvest moose. By combining indigenous observations and understanding of climate and western social/natural sciences, this study examines the complex, multi-scaled interaction of climate change and subsistence livelihoods, with the goal of understanding vulnerability and adaptive capacity in the Koyukuk-Middle Yukon (KMY) region.

Abstract

Human adaptation to climate change is comprised of “adjustments” in response to (or anticipation of) climatic impacts. Adaptation does not necessarily imply favorable or equitable change, nor does it automatically imply sustainable use of ecosystems. “Sustainable adaptation” in this case implies strategic, collective action to respond to or anticipate harmful climate change to reduce disruption to key resource flows and adverse effects on general well-being.

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