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Location

United States
42° 13' 11.4276" N, 83° 40' 18.75" W

Project Summary/Overview

In the Great Lakes region, climate change is predicted to bring greater amounts of precipitation falling in shorter periods of time, resulting in increased flooding. For Detroit, flooding brings an extra problem – sewage overflows. This realization inspired the Sierra Club Great Lakes Program to get involved in the sewer overflow issue and begin exploring green infrastructure solutions. Green infrastructure creates rainwater filtration right at the surface, keeping rainwater from entering the combined sewer system and preventing additional sewage pollution in the Great Lakes. This case study is also part of a Climate Adaptation Toolkit, developed in partnership between EcoAdapt and Freshwater Future.

Location

United States
40° 35' 4.1208" N, 75° 58' 53.202" W
Organization: 

Project Summary/Overview

Pennsylvania Sea Grant (PASG) has addressed climate change issues throughout the state by providing research, education, and outreach to local coastal communities. Their projects have examined the possible risks and vulnerabilities to coastal communities and natural ecosystems in the state. PASG staff have created educational materials and tools to support public awareness and decision making in the state.

Abstract

This report was developed for the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Wetlands Program and Coastal Management Program. However, the DEQ has only part of the responsibilities and authorities that will be part of any comprehensive approach to implementing a climate change adaptation plan for the state’s wetlands. Carrying out many of the recommendations in this document will require the cooperation, expertise and active engagement of many other state, local, and regional agencies and groups.

Abstract

The Coastal Hazards Center at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) has developed a handbook to help local governments in North Carolina adapt to climate change. The handbook demonstrates the need for local action and explains the options that are open to local governments.Climate change is and will continue to impact every community in North Carolina, the United States and indeed the world.

Location

United States
44° 55' 46.866" N, 93° 31' 20.838" W

Project Summary/Overview

Climate change projections show an increase in the frequency and severity of storms across Minnesota; the resulting increase in runoff and flow may overwhelm the region’s existing stormwater management systems. This project aims to assist regional managers in the Minnehaha Creek watershed cope with uncertainty from climate projections and identify ways to adapt stormwater systems to future conditions. The project includes two study sites in the cities of Minneapolis and Victoria.

Climate Resilience Evaluation & Awareness Tool (CREAT)

Profiles: 

EPA has developed CREAT, a software tool to assist drinking water and wastewater utility owners and operators in understanding potential climate change threats and in assessing the related risks at their individual utilities. CREAT provides users with access to the most recent national assessment of climate change impacts for use in considering how these changes will impact utility operations and missions. Version 2.0 is now available for download free of charge.

Who should use your tool?: 

The Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool (CREAT), developed under EPA’s Climate Ready Water Utilities initiative, assists drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater utility owners and operators in assessing risks to utility assets and operations.

Type of Tool: 
Adaptation Planning / Decision Support
Decision Support
Impact or Vulnerability Assessment
Tool Cost: 
Free
Sector Addressed: 
Water Resources

Location

United States
46° 49' 12.3996" N, 94° 44' 45.9384" W

Project Summary/Overview

Sustaining Lakes in a Changing Environment (SLICE) is the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ (MDNR) Section of Fisheries’ long-term monitoring program. Information on water chemistry, fisheries, habitat, and other biological and chemical indicators is being gathered to assist in the development of management approaches that include a better understanding of how the state’s aquatic ecosystems respond to a variety of stressors. The first phase of the project (2008-2012) includes monitoring processes and exploring drivers of change in water quality and fish habitat condition in 24 sentinel lakes across the state’s four predominant ecosystem types. The second phase is slated to begin in 2012 and will examine and apply lessons learned from Phase 1 in order to create a robust, long-term lake monitoring program that includes land use and climate change considerations.

Abstract

The purpose of this white paper is to provide an overview of climate related adaptation and resilience oriented efforts underway at the Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans). In recognition of the potentially negative consequences of climate change to well-being of Vermont, VTrans is in process of incorporating adaptive management, policies, and plans into every level of planning, design, operations, and maintenance.Experts believe that global climate change will fuel increasingly frequent and severe weather events resulting in more frequent flooding in the Northeastern U.S.

Location

United States
43° 39' 11.6136" N, 79° 22' 59.4624" W

Project Summary/Overview

Like many cities in the Great Lakes region, Toronto is already experiencing the impacts and consequences of climate change. To better prepare for the future, the City of Toronto created a comprehensive climate change adaptation strategy in 2008. The development and implementation process of the adaptation strategy is well cataloged in subsequent reports and other documents. As of 2011, the City of Toronto has actively implemented 76 programs or projects designed to help Toronto adapt to climate change.

Location

United States
41° 29' 59.2836" N, 85° 52' 8.9076" W

Project Summary/Overview

Projected climate impacts in the Northwoods region include warmer temperatures, longer growing seasons, shifts in the timing and amount of precipitation, changes in soil moisture patterns, increasing pests and diseases, and more frequent storms, droughts, floods, and wildfires. These changes are likely to significantly affect the forests, ecosystems, and wildlife of the region. To help land managers and landowners prepare for and adapt to potential impacts, researchers at the Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science (NIACS) have led the development of the Climate Change Response Framework. This Framework walks stakeholders through vulnerability assessment and adaptation planning processes and provides users with a set of tools, partnerships, and actions to support climate-smart conservation and forest management.

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