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Abstract

Climate change refers to change over time due to natural variability or as a result of human activity (IPCC, 2008). Alaska communities are experiencing a wide range of impacts from climate change and residents seek adaptive strategies that encourage wellness and sustainability. This report documents climate change impacts and potential impacts as described by the local people and interpreted through the lens of public health. It is the sixth report in a series describing climate change across Alaska, and the rst report to focus on the Bristol Bay Region.

Abstract

On a narrow promontory extending far out into the Chukchi Sea, the village of Point Hope enjoys one of the nest locations in Alaska for the harvest of subsistence resources, including sh, marine mammals, birds and caribou. This amazing place has allowed the Inupiat of Point Hope to ourish for centuries, and it is one of the oldest continuously occupied communities in Alaska. But it is also one of the most exposed, vulnerable to the full force of coastal storms and the constant shaping of the land by the wind and the sea.

Abstract

Rural Arctic communities are vulnerable to climate change and residents seek adaptive strategies that will protect public health. In the Inupiat community of Selawik, climate change is impacting the weather, land, river, wildlife, plants, and the lives of the people who live there. This report identi es health concerns related to food and water security, and community infrastructure including water and sanitation.

Abstract

This climate change health assessment project was initiated in 2013 by the North Slope Borough, Health Impact Assessment (HIA) program with a grant from the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska. The project is in collaboration with the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC), Center for Climate and Health, and participating local governments. ANTHC performed an assessment in 2009 in Point Hope with funding from the U.S. Indian Health Service.

Abstract

Climate change refers to change over time due to natural variability or as a result of human activity (IPCC, 2008). Alaska is experiencing a wide range of impacts from climate change and communities seek adaptive strategies that encourage wellness and sustainability. This report documents climate change impacts as described by community residents and climate change effects or potential effects as interpreted through the lens of public health.

Abstract

Rural Arctic communities are vulnerable to climate change and seek adaptation strategies that will protect health and health infrastructure. This report describes climate change impacts on Kivalina, a small Inupiat Eskimo community located on the coast of the Chukchi Sea. Data sources included the observations of local residents, reports from local and regional government of cials and health professionals, and scienti c evidence gathered from published sources.

Abstract

Rural Arctic communities are vulnerable to climate change and residents seek adaptive strategies that will protect health and health infrastructure. In the Inupiat community of Kiana, climate change is impacting the weather, land, river, wildlife, plants, and the lives of the people who live there. Identi ed health concerns include food insecurity, damage to water and sanitation infrastructure, and increased risk of injury related to unpredictable weather conditions.

Abstract

In 2012 the Bristol Bay Native Association (BBNA) in partnership with Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC) and the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) began evaluating the connecting between climate change impacts and health. The purpose, to encourage wellness and to adapt to changes in the Bristol Bay region.

Abstract

Understanding local impact of climate change is important for assessing negative and positive effects, and developing appropriate adaptation strategies. In Atqasuk, residents report changes to the weather, seasons, landscape, plants, wildlife and infrastructure, with important implications for public health. Atqasuk is a river community, vulnerable to thawing of permafrost and erosion on the river bank and in tundra lakes. The community is also impacted by weather and vegetation on the land and concerned about how climate change will affect wild food resources.

Abstract

The Bering Strait region has long been characterized by permafrost and ice, an environment that was mostly cold and frozen. Human habitation in the region dates back some 10,000 years from the time of Beringia. While the ice ages covered most of North America with glaciers, Beringia was a vast grassland; a temperate refuge in an otherwise frozen north.

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