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Abstract

Cities and other local authorities have a critical stake in the adaptation of water management to a changing climate. Virtually all the world’s future population growth is predicted to take place in cities and their urban landscapes. The UN estimates a global increase from the 2.9 billion urban residents in the 1990s to a staggering 5.0 billion by 2030. By 2030, 1 in 4 persons will live in a city of 500,000 people, and 1 in 10 will live in a mega-city of 10 million or more. How will climate change and variability affect water services and water safety for these many millions?

Abstract

Whatever happens to future greenhouse gas emissions, we are now locked into inevitable changes to climate patterns. Adaptation to climate change is therefore no longer a secondary and long-term response option only to be used as a last resort. It is now prevalent and imperative, and for those communities already vulnerable to the impacts of present day climate hazards, an urgent imperative. Successful adaptation must be accomplished through actions that target and reduce the vulnerabilities poor people now face, as they are likely to become more prevalent as the climate changes.

Abstract

The diverse landscapes of the U.S. Midwest, and the natural processes, livelihoods, and infrastructure associated with them, are vulnerable to climate change. This report, pre- pared as a contribution to the Third National Climate Assessment, addresses the potential impacts of climate change on natural systems, human health, and several important economic sectors within the Midwest. Key findings of the report include the following:

Abstract

Climate change is already affecting millions of people worldwide. In urban areas, which are typically characterized by significantly higher population density, climate change will exacerbate and compound existing climate vulnerabilities, especially for the urban poor. As a result of climate change, it is expected that storm frequency and intensity will increase, flooding will become more serious and droughts will affect food production in rural areas, which will have damaging effects in cities. Coastal areas are particularly threatened by inundation from storm surges and sea-level rise.

Abstract

Climate change is already affecting millions of people worldwide. In urban areas, which are typically characterized by a significantly higher population density, climate change will exacerbate and compound existing vulnerabilities, especially for the urban poor. As a result of climate change, we expect that storm frequency and intensity will increase, flooding will become increasingly significant and droughts will affect food production in rural areas, which will result in damaging knock-on effects in urban areas.

Abstract

The Honiara City Council Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment was developed in response to a request for assistance to UNDP and UN-Habitat by the Solomon Island Government through the Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology and the Ministry of Lands, Housing and Survey to implement key recommendations of the Solomon Islands National Development Strategy (2011-2020) and the National Climate Change Policy (2012-2017).Given the Government of the Solomon Islands National Climate Change Policy directive, the main purpose of the vulnerability

Abstract

This webinar focuses on how cities and communities may best respond to the complexities of a changing climate and how to best adapt to on-the-ground issues. Community-driven climate adaptation efforts in Brooklyn, New York and Detroit, Michigan are highlighted. Speakers include Kara Reeve (National Wildlife Federation), Kimberly Hill Knott (Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice), Elizabeth Yeampierre (Uprose), and Lara Hansen (EcoAdapt).

Abstract

As California considers how to adapt to a changing climate, planners often focus on defensive infrastructure with a negative habitat impact: bigger levees, rock walls to protect coastlines or even giant sea gates.

But California can follow a different path. With natural or “green” infrastructure that leverages natural processes to reduce risk to human lives, property and businesses, the state can build resilience to the coming changes while restoring natural habitats instead of degrading them.

Abstract

With the majority of the world's population living in urban areas, its time to ask how they can become more livable, sustainable and resilient. biodiverCities explores why biodiversity should be the business of everyone committed to building more sustainable cities.

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to capture best practices and lessons learned from experts in the field who are contributing to an integrated approach to climate adaptation + mitigation (A+M) to cut carbon pollution (mitigation) and prepare the nation for climate change impacts (adaptation).

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