Climate Adaptation in the Clayoquot Sound

Location

United States
49° 9' 8.7624" N, 125° 54' 8.9748" W
US
Author Name(s): 
John Lerner, Neil Hughes, Rachel Holt, Tom Okey, Katie Beach, Martin Carver, Theo Mlynowski, Don MacKinnon
Organization: 
Summary: 

According to ClimateBC modeling projections, the Clayoquot Sound region can expect the mean annual temperature to increase as much as 4°C by the 2080s under the more extreme scenario (A1F1: increasing emissions).

Email Address: 
Position Title: 
Founder, Healthy Waters Coalition

An Integrated Regional Climate Strategy: An Impossible Dream?

One of the most publicized impacts of global warming is a predicted acceleration of sea level rise. Water levels in San Francisco Bay could rise by 1.4 meters by the end of this century and flood over 330 square miles of low-lying shoreline property and $60 billion of property. The San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission has formulated a broad outline of a comprehensive strategy for addressing climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to sea level rise in the Bay Area region.

The City of Lewes Hazard Mitigation and Climate Adaptation Action Plan

From the Executive Summary:

Lewes, Delaware, with its strong history of hazard mitigation planning and preparedness is perfectly poised to take advantage of an increasing understanding of climate change impacts. It is already known that temperatures are rising, glaciers are retreating, snowpack is disappearing, spring is arriving earlier, and seas are rising. These changes will exacerbate hazards that are known to threaten Lewes today. While these changes cannot be prevented, the effects of these events are dependent upon the choices and actions that Lewes makes today.

Given the increasing future threats that Lewes faces, the overall goal of the Hazard Mitigation and Climate Adaptation pilot project has been to further the City’s hazard mitigation work by incorporating climate adaptation. The project has developed this unified plan that aims to improve community sustainability and resilience. Local officials and residents have been engaged through four workshops to determine the City’s greatest existing and future vulnerabilities and to chart a course of action to reduce these vulnerabilities.

The subsequent sections provide further details on the project, the methods used and the outcomes of the effort. Section 1 focuses on providing a context for this effort and details the methods used. Section 2 provides a case for engaging in both hazard mitigation and climate adaptation. Section 3 details the natural hazards assessed. Section 4 is focused on the climate change knowledge and impacts to natural hazards that were presented to workshop participants. Section 5 outlines the vulnerability self‐assessments that were conducted during the workshops. These assessments resulted in the identification of two key vulnerabilities. The first is Lewes’ water system and the combined threats of saltwater intrusion into the aquifer and destruction of water conveyance systems that it faces from sea level rise. The second vulnerability is the destructive impacts on homes and City infrastructure from increased flooding.

Based upon these two key vulnerabilities, Section 6 describes the action selection process. Through this process, the following six actions were identified as recommendations that the City begin implementing. Finally, Section 7 provides implementation guidance for these identified actions.

  • Incorporate climate change concerns into the comprehensive plan and into future reviews of the building and zoning codes. Recommended actions and implementation guidance are included on page 53.
  • Improve outreach and education particularly focused on successful behavior changes related to home building and retrofits. Recommended actions and implementation guidance are included on page 59.
  • Ensure that aquifer information is integrated into all planning efforts. Recommended actions and implementation guidance are included on page 63.
  • Use elevation data to determine road levels and evacuation risk. Recommended actions and implementation guidance are included on page 65.
  • Evaluate the City and the Board of Public Works (BPW) infrastructure's flood vulnerability from direct flood impacts as well as from indirect flood impacts to access routes. Recommended actions and implementation guidance are included on page 67.
  • Improve the City’s level of participation in the community rating system (CRS). Recommended actions and implementation guidance are included on page 69.
Email Address: 
Position Title: 
Climate Change Outreach Specialist

Xeni Gwet'in Community-based Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

Location

Canada
52° 8' 59.4096" N, 123° 11' 53.5056" W
CA
Organization: 
Summary: 

According to ClimateBC projections, the Xeni Gwet’in Caretaker Area (XGCA) can expect to see increased warming (~+2.5°C) and precipitation (~+104 mm) by 2050. Seasonally, most of the temperature increase will occur in the winter and spring and most of the precipitation increase will occur during the fall and winter, with summers becoming drier overall.

Position Title: 
Senior Counsel

Building Climate Resiliency in the Lower Willamette Region of Western Oregon

Location

United States
45° 52' 11.2836" N, 123° 40' 5.592" W
US
Summary: 

The Lower Willamette region is located in northwestern Oregon and is predicted to experience climate changes including increases in temperature, extreme weather events, and reduced snowpack. To address these challenges, the Climate Leadership Initiative (CLI) conducted a series of workshops and published a report entitled “Building Climate Resiliency in the Lower Willamette Region of Western Oregon.” The report provides 40 multi-sector adaptation recommendations to prepare the Portland area for a changing climate.

Emerging from the famous Brundtland Report, Our Common Future, the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE or Round Table) has become a model for convening diverse and competing interests around one table to create consensus ideas and viable suggestions for sustainable development. The NRTEE focuses on sustaining Canada’s prosperity without borrowing resources from future generations or compromising their ability to live securely.