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Abstract

This report was developed by the North Carolina Interagency Leadership Team (ILT), a group of eleven state and federal agencies, to communicate to planners and engineers, working for the public and private sectors, about the potential effects and risks due to changes in climate and extreme weather events, as well as strategies for considering those effects and risks in planning, design and implementation of projects.

Abstract

In his Climate Action Plan, President Barack Obama acknowledged the risks of climate change to families, businesses, infrastructure, and water supplies across the country. To help metro areas manage these risks, the president pledged to reduce flood damage by raising flood elevation standards for federally funded infrastructure projects, to support community resilience through existing federal grant programs, and to make climate change information more accessible, among other actions.

Abstract

Innovative and unique solutions are being devised throughout the national park system to adapt to climate change in coastal parks. The 24 case studies in this document describe efforts at national park units in a variety of settings to prepare for and respond to climate change impacts that can take the form of either an event or a trend. Examples of these impacts include increased storminess, sea level rise, shoreline erosion, melting sea ice and permafrost, ocean acidification, warming temperatures, groundwater inundation, precipitation, and drought.

Location

United States
38° 6' 41.2704" N, 75° 12' 19.9296" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Trish Kicklighter

Project Summary

Assateague Island National Seashore is developing a general management plan that addresses projected climate change impacts on resources and infrastructure. The plan must include a range of management tools for improving resource resiliency and repairing facilities that will be impacted by climate change and storms. 

Location

1698 Island Rd
28531 Harkers Island , NC
United States
34° 41' 10.122" N, 76° 31' 52.212" W
North Carolina US
Author Name(s): 
Patrick Kenney

Project Summary

Cape Lookout National Seashore is regularly impacted by hurricanes and other storms. To improve park management, the park needed to develop a post-storm recovery plan to ensure wise fiscal decisions and management of public expectations for what facilities and services can be restored following these major events. 

Location

United States
30° 23' 37.6512" N, 86° 45' 51.0588" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Dan Brown

Project Summary

In Florida, the Fort Pickens Road within Gulf Islands National Seashore is regularly destroyed by storms, and repairs are expensive and time consuming. The park continues to reevaluate the local conditions and implement cost-effective, sustainable modes of visitor access to Fort Pickens beaches and the historic fort. 

Location

United States
25° 18' 37.8396" N, 81° 0' 7.9092" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Fred Herling

Project Summary

Visitor facilities in the Flamingo area of Everglades National Park in Florida were destroyed by two hurricanes in 2005. Incorporating climate change sustainability into the redevelopment plan has required extensive data gathering efforts and public engagement. 

Location

99 Marconi Site Road
02667 Wellfleet , MA
United States
41° 54' 20.142" N, 69° 58' 43.1904" W
Massachusetts US
Author Name(s): 
Mark Borrelli

Project Summary

Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts, needs to replace visitor facilities along a popular beach vulnerable to coastal erosion and storm impacts. Redesigning this area required collaboration with visitors, town representatives, coastal engineers, and scientists to incorporate visitor use and needs with the realities of coastal change. 

Location

United States
30° 12' 40.5396" N, 88° 57' 24.066" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Larissa Read

Project Summary

The large-scale project known as the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) is intended to restore multiple barrier islands and protect cultural resources within Gulf Islands National Seashore by recreating sediment transport processes and replacing a portion of sediment lost to dredging and storm impacts. 

Location

United States
24° 37' 42.5172" N, 82° 52' 23.4732" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Dan Kimball, Marcy Rockman, and Kelly Clark

Project Summary

Sea level rise and increased tropical storm intensity pose a serious risk to the long-term sustainability of historic Fort Jefferson at Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida. The park is trying to mitigate these effects over time through strategic planning, informed decision making, and responsible investments that consider historical integrity and long-term sustainability of the fort and island on which it was built. 

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