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Abstract

Livestock production systems in the LMB range from traditional smallholder livestock-keeping systems to large highly productive commercial enterprises. Traditional systems are small-scale, low intensity, low-input, low-output systems, typically raising stock of local genetics and with limited market orientation. They contribute well over 90% of total numbers of producers in the LMB, and over 50% of total production. These systems dominate the higher elevation forested and more sloping ecozones and typically are associated with low-income, vulnerable households.

Abstract

Growing conditions for agriculture are diverse in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), from the mountainous areas of Lao PDR and the Central Highlands in Vietnam to the lowland plains in the Mekong Delta. Farming systems range from traditional shifting agriculture systems dominated by upland rice through industrial plantations, including smallholder intensive rice farmers.

Abstract

The USAID Mekong ARCC project is a five- year project (2011-2016) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Regional Development Mission for Asia (RDMA) in Bangkok and implemented by Development Alternatives Inc. (DAI) in partnership with International Centre for Environmental Management (ICEM) and World Resources Institute (WRI).

Abstract

EcoAdapt, in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service and California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (CA LCC) hosted the Adaptation Planning Workshop for the Sierra Nevada June 4-5, 2013 in Sacramento, California. The goal of the workshop was to identify management strategies that will help regionally important ecosystems and species adapt to changing climate conditions and to lay the groundwork for adaptation action. Thirty-two attendees representing 21 public agencies (including national forests), non-governmental organizations, and others participated in the workshop.

Abstract

This vulnerability assessment is an initial science-based effort to identify how and why focal resources (ecosystems, species populations, and ecosystem services) across the Sierra Nevada region are likely to be affected by future climate conditions. The overarching goal is to help resource managers and stakeholders plan their management of these focal resources in light of a changing climate. Specifically, this information can facilitate priority setting for management action and responses, helping to sustain optimal conditions for and productivity of focal resources.

Reef Resilience Toolkit

Location

Reef Resilience Network
74 Wall St.
98121 Seattle , WA
United States
47° 36' 50.5512" N, 122° 20' 58.614" W
Washington US
Tool Overview: 

The Reef Resilience Toolkit provides marine managers and practitioners with easy access to the latest science and strategies and networking opportunities to help them better manage and protect coral reefs, reef fisheries, and associated marine habitats. Created and updated by global experts, the Toolkit features:

Abstract

The following “Guiding Principles” embrace those concepts and values that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) “believes in” and will apply to the development of policies and strategies to guide our actions and recommendations pertaining to the management of Maryland’s rivers and streams. These Guiding Principles provide a science-based perspective on rivers and streams intended to help DNR’s Environmental Review Unit effectively evaluate and consistently formulate sound recommendations on proposed projects that could adversely impact these important aquatic resources.

Abstract

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States, fed by a watershed that stretches from mountains to sea, across 64,000 square miles. The Chesapeake Bay, along with Maryland’s streams and coastal bays, provides a multitude of benefits to Maryland’s citizens, including economic and natural resource benefits. Maryland’s extensive aquatic ecosystems range from freshwater swamps and bogs to freshwater rivers and marshes to coastal bays and salt marshes. These ecosystems are influenced by precipitation, temperature, tropical storms, and human activity.

Abstract

Risk management is critical in any restoration project. Risks include those associated with climate patterns, such as more intense storms, as well as those associated with land use change, site selection, and design. Addressing these risks in conjunction with ongoing restoration efforts will prepare communities for greater variability and may result in cost savings and reduced risk.

Best Management Practices (BMPs) should be sited and designed with climate change impacts in mind.

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