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Abstract

This report presents the results of EcoAdapt’s efforts to survey adaptation action in marine fisheries management by examining the major climate impacts on marine and coastal fisheries in the United States, assessing related challenges to fisheries management, and presenting examples of actions taken to decrease vulnerability and/or increase resilience. First, we provide a summary of climate change impacts and secondary effects on fisheries, focusing on changes in air and water temperatures, precipitation patterns, storms, ocean circulation, sea level rise, and water chemistry.

Abstract

While previous research has documented marine fish and invertebrates shifting poleward in response to warming climates, less is known about the response of fisheries to these changes. By examining fisheries in the northeastern United States over the last four decades of warming temperatures, we show that northward shifts in species distributions were matched by corresponding northward shifts in fisheries. The proportion of warm-water species caught in most states also increased through time.

Location

United States
48° 54' 11.6856" N, 84° 48' 52.0308" W
US

Project Summary

This integrated research project, which ran from 2007-2008, was initiated to better understand the implications of projected climate change impacts and adaptation responses on southern Ontario’s fish, fisheries, and water resources. Climate change will have predominantly negative effects on species and habitats, and resulting economic effects are expected to be devastating to the region. In addition, changes in temperature and precipitation patterns will require alterations to water resources planning and management.

Abstract

Our ancestral territories stretch from the Cascade Mountains westward to the Pacific Ocean. They encompass diverse subregions with distinct ecosystems that face both shared and unique challenges in the face of climate change. A wide variety of plants and animals have sustained our communities for thousands of years, providing food, fuel, shelter, medicines, and materials for commerce. Our natural resources form the foundation for our spiritual life, sacred ceremonies, and community cohesion.

Abstract

The opportunity for increasing community resilience is in the very process of developing a plan when those who are most impacted are at the heart of society’s efforts to build a resilient future.

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Abstract

This report is Part II of a two part series produced under the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative Tribal Climate Change initiative on Knowledge Sovereignty. Part I Karuk Traditional Ecological Knowledge and the Need for Knowledge Sovereignty: Social, Cultural and Economic Impacts of Denied Access to Traditional Management situates Karuk traditional knowledge in the practice of cultural management, indicating how Karuk knowledge must remain connected to both the practices that generated the information, and the practices that emerge from it.

Abstract

Promising Practices for EJ Methodologies in NEPA Reviews, an EJ IWG report produced by the NEPA Committee (hereinafter referred to as “Promising Practices Report”) represents the professional experience, knowledge, and expertise of the individuals participating in the NEP A Committee. The NEP A Committee (see List of NEP A Committee Participants from ten departments, three agencies, and one White House office) spent almost 48 months researching, analyzing and discussing the interaction ofenvironmentaljusticeandNEPA.

Abstract

Climate change and extreme weather events are already affecting the way that American Indian and Alaska Native tribes are using, receiving, and producing energy. As climate change worsens, energy infrastructure in the United States—including tribal energy infrastructure—is expected to be increasingly threatened by higher temperatures, less available water, and more frequent and intense heavy downpours, floods, heat waves, and droughts.

Abstract

At state, local, tribal, and territorial levels, leaders are making bold decisions on ways to invest in more resilient infrastructure, revise land use, update building codes, and adjust natural resource management and other practices to improve the resilience of their communities to climate impacts.

Abstract

Extreme weather events and nuisance ooding are increasing, with communities already experiencing impacts. Both the identi cation of local hazards and the assessment of local vulnerabilities can protect people, their property, and their livelihoods.

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