Subscribe to RSS - Capacity Building

Abstract

This report documents future coastal erosion hazards and the methodology used to estimate potential erosion, as part of the Coastal Infrastructure and Vulnerability Assessment Project. The study provides estimates of coastal erosion hazards for the California coast from Santa Barbara to the Oregon border. In addition, PWA compiled a statewide base flood elevation layer to support a flood analysis by the Pacific Institute (Pacific Institute 2009).

Abstract

New Hampshire’s Climate Action Plan presents an opportunity to:

  • Spur economic growth through investment in our own state’s economy of monies currently spent on energy imports.
  • Create jobs and economic growth through development of in-state sources of energy from renewable and low emitting resources, and green technology development and deployment by New Hampshire businesses.
  • Avoid the significant costs of responding to a changing climate on the state’s infrastructure, economy, and the health of our citizens.

Abstract

The Immediate Action Workgroup of the Governor’s Executive Subcabinet on Climate Change was established to address known threats to communities caused by coastal erosion, thawing permafrost, flooding, and fires. The objective was to close a planning and execution gap identified by Governor Palin and the Congressional delegation by creating a unifying mechanism to assist the communities of Newtok, Shishmaref, Kivalina, Koyukuk, Unalakleet,and Shaktoolik.

Abstract

The Parish recognizes the need to shift the dominant restoration philosophy in the region from a defensive strategy to an offensive strategy. Continuing to wall off vast expanses of coastal wetlands in hope that it will preserve them indefinitely is no longer an option. Simply writing off aggressive action to restore ecosystem structures and functions at a scale commensurate with their ongoing loss as “too expensive” is no longer acceptable.

Abstract

The effects of climate change have become a relevant and important issue of national concern in the past decade. While significant debate remains over the extent to which humans have induced climate change, it has generally been accepted that the effects of climate change are manifested in terms of increased weather variability, a higher frequency of extreme weather events and decreased predictability (Berkes and Jolly 2001; Smit et al. 2003; Venema 2005).

Abstract

This chapter develops a framework to explore examples of adaptation options that could be used to ensure that the ecosystem services provided by forests are maintained under future climates. The services are divided into broad areas within which managers can identify specific management goals for individual forests or landscapes. Adaptation options exist for the major forest regions of the world but the scientific basis for these adaptation options and their potential effectiveness varies across regions.

Abstract

Even though climate change affects countries differently, all countries will need to perform many of the same adaptation functions, such as climate information management and public engagement in adaptation planning. At the end of 2008, the World Resources Institute convened a technical workshop in Bellagio, Italy to begin enumerating a shared set of critical adaptation functions. The resulting “Bellagio Framework” can help identify strengths and gaps in adaptation capacities in a given country, as a basis for prioritizing adaptation actions and investments.

Abstract

IISD Climate and Energy team members planned and facilitated a workshop intended to bring together key Manitoba-based academics, researchers, policy-makers and project coordinators to discuss current adaptation-related research and activities, consider relevant initiatives being promoted federally that support provincial adaptation work and support identification of priority areas for a proposed Manitoba Climate Research Table.

Abstract

On June 27, 2008, forty representatives from Great Lakes foundations, non‐governmental organizations, agencies, and universities, convened in Flint, Michigan for a one‐day workshop titled “Preparing for Climate Change in the Great Lakes Region.” The workshop was sponsored by the Mott Foundation, Joyce Foundation, Kresge Foundation, the Great Lakes Fishery Trust, and Michigan Sea Grant. The objectives of the workshop were to:

Abstract

Management strategy evaluation (MSE) is the process of using simulation testing with feedback to examine the robustness of candidate management strategies to error and uncertainty. The structure of the management strategy can be selected to attempt to satisfy desired (but conflicting) management objectives.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Capacity Building