Subscribe to RSS - Community Planning (developing climate-smart communities)

Abstract

This report explores the ‘scaling out’ of CBA pilots, which is defined as ‘more quality benefits to more people over a wider geographical area, more equitably, more quickly, and more lastingly’. Rather than higher-level policy integration, it focuses on how multiple local actors can pilot small-scale innovations and showcase them until their approaches are replicated by multiple local actors, and a particular technology, practice or local regulatory approach becomes widespread.

Abstract

The authors explore the many successful strategies and measures for climate resilience and low carbon development that communities and leaders have pursued at the subnational level.  They draw on the rich and practical experiences of CDKN’s project partners and the broader ICLEI network.They argue that the battle for climate compatible development will be won or lost in provinces, districts and cities.

The Umbrella

Tool Overview: 

The Umbrella is an online tool designed to promote knowledge-sharing and collaboration on stormwater and other green infrastructure issues. The Umbrella is hosted and managed by Green Communities Canada in association with our RAIN program

Abstract

This document describes planning tools being used across Canada to help communities prepare for climate change, increase adaptive capacity and build resilience. It is directed to individuals and groups interested in climate change adaptation at the local level, including planners and other local government staff, elected officials, community organizations, local residents and business leaders.

Abstract

The National Climate Assessment assesses the science of climate change and its impacts across the United States, now and throughout this century. It documents climate change related impacts and responses for various sectors and regions, with the goal of better informing public and private decision-making at all levels.

Abstract

Climate change is expected to place increasing stress on the built and natural environments of cities as well as create new challenges for the provision of urban services and management systems. Minimizing the impacts of climate change requires that cities develop and implement adaptation plans. Despite the imperative, only a small number of cities have initiated the adaptation planning process. Drawing on theories of diffusion and capacity, and empirical assessments of initiatives in Durban, South Africa and Quito, Ecuador, this paper examines two questions:

Abstract

In order to protect local citizens from public health and safety risks and to protect public and private investments, communities should begin to plan for the impacts of climate change that our state is experiencing now and will continue to experience in the future.

Abstract

Maryland citizens are blessed with an abundant supply of water. However, many water systems are already stressed during droughts, and infrastructure damage and water contamination occurs during floods. Future population growth will combine with increasingly variable weather patterns to place more communities at risk of property damage, regulatory liabilities and uncertain access to drinking water. Maryland’s Eastern Shore is particularly susceptible to salt water intrusion as water demand increases and sea levels rise.

Abstract

This report focuses on the economic impacts caused by polluted urban runoff, also known as “stormwater,” a significantly growing source of water pollution in the United States. It’s not intended to be an academic or technical document, but instead to be an “easy to read” compendium of current experiences, analysis and knowledge. Our goal is to provide something useful for municipal and utility officials, local, state and national elected representatives, and the general public.

Location

United States
50° 1' 28.434" N, 114° 55' 24.708" W
US

Project Summary

Grizzly bears, moose, mountain goats, deer, elk—all call Elkford, British Columbia home. Wild at Heart is the community slogan and the area is known as the wilderness capitol of British Columbia. As a Rocky Mountain town, the local economy is dependent on the surrounding natural resources—coal mining, logging and increasingly, tourism. How does a community that values it wilderness, wildlife, and depends on the natural resources adapt to climate change? By finding solutions that are in sync with community values.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Community Planning (developing climate-smart communities)