Subscribe to RSS - Conduct vulnerability assessments and studies

Abstract

Our goal is to develop practical, nationally consistent, legally justifiable, and cost effective measures, both structural and nonstructural, to reduce our vulnerability, while increasing our resilience to climate change. We are engaged in a collaborative approach, partnering with other federal agencies. This collaboration takes advantage of our different perspectives and expertise so that our progress reflects the best available and actionable science.

Abstract

CCVA Report - Part 1 presents the results of "climate stress test" on the city of Cambridge, MA.  The vulnerability assessment focuses on risks related to rising tempertures and greater precipitation.  The science-based assessment was conducted in an interdisciplinary manner with extensive communitya stakeholder engagement.

Abstract

One of the consequences of climate change is that new kinds of information will be needed to support policy- and decision making. The vulnerability approach is an established methodology for providing information in a form that supports policy- and decision making in the context of adapting to climate change. For example, climate change is ubiquitous, so approaches to assessment are needed that simultaneously consider the breadth of impacts both on forests and on sustainable forest management objectives.

Abstract

Maintaining sustainable forest management practices in Canada during the 21st century and beyond will be a major challenge, given the uncertainties of global socioeconomic development and multiple interacting consequences of global environmental change. Scenarios represent an important tool for decision makers to use in exploring the causes and effects of possible changes in future environmental conditions and the implications of those changes for forests and the social, environmental, and economic benefits that forests provide.

Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Tool for Coastal Habitats (CCVATCH)

Location

United States
35° 46' 20.6544" N, 76° 53' 32.2872" W
US
Tool Overview: 

The Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Tool for Coastal Habitats (CCVATCH) is a decision support tool for land managers, decision-makers, and researchers that integrates local data and knowledge and current research with local/regional climate change predictions to provide an assessment of potential habitat vulnerabilities.

Abstract

Innovative and unique solutions are being devised throughout the national park system to adapt to climate change in coastal parks. The 24 case studies in this document describe efforts at national park units in a variety of settings to prepare for and respond to climate change impacts that can take the form of either an event or a trend. Examples of these impacts include increased storminess, sea level rise, shoreline erosion, melting sea ice and permafrost, ocean acidification, warming temperatures, groundwater inundation, precipitation, and drought.

Location

Denver , CO
United States
39° 44' 21.2496" N, 104° 59' 24.9036" W
Colorado US
Author Name(s): 
Rebecca Beavers, Maria Caffrey

Project Summary

The National Park Service Geologic Resources Division (NPS GRD) is working with the University of Colorado Boulder to develop sea level change and storm surge data that parks can use for planning purposes over multiple time horizons. 

Location

United States
37° 49' 31.1808" N, 122° 29' 55.536" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Jodi Eshleman and Kristen Ward

Project Summary

Golden Gate National Recreation Area is collaborating with local, state, and federal agencies to develop a long-term management strategy for Ocean Beach, where bluff erosion threatens natural and recreational resources, wastewater infrastructure, and a roadway (the Great Highway). Sea level rise and increased storminess are expected to increase the frequency of erosional events. 

Location

United States
27° 53' 15.5004" N, 81° 17' 55.7808" W
US

Project Summary

Although Florida habitats and species face significant threats related to sea level rise, Florida’s first state wildlife action plan did not comprehensively consider climate change impacts. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) worked with partners to assess species vulnerability using new models and approaches during the first revision of the state wildlife action plan. 

Location

99 Marconi Site Road
02667 Wellfleet , MA
United States
41° 54' 20.142" N, 69° 58' 43.1904" W
Massachusetts US
Author Name(s): 
Mark Borrelli

Project Summary

Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts, needs to replace visitor facilities along a popular beach vulnerable to coastal erosion and storm impacts. Redesigning this area required collaboration with visitors, town representatives, coastal engineers, and scientists to incorporate visitor use and needs with the realities of coastal change. 

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