Subscribe to RSS - Conduct vulnerability assessments and studies

Location

United States
44° 19' 15.7944" N, 68° 12' 39.6756" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Rebecca Cole-Will
Organization: 

Project Summary

Acadia National Park in Maine is working to rehabilitate historic road systems and culverts that have been damaged by increasingly frequent flooding and erosion events that were causing maintenance and visitor use closures.

Location

United States
34° 40' 31.2924" N, 76° 37' 54.1164" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Mark Kinzer and Patrick Kenney

Project Summary

Cape Lookout National Seashore had to evaluate whether it was appropriate to pursue opportunities to mitigate shoreline erosion along Shackleford Banks, a proposed wilderness area.

Location

United States
44° 25' 52.8492" N, 110° 22' 12.2484" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Rebecca Beavers, Courtney Schupp, Ian Slayton, Maria Caffrey

Project Summary

Yellowstone National Park collaborated with the National Park Service Geologic Resources Division (NPS GRD) to examine the causes of shoreline erosion on Peale Island and to identify adaptation options for protecting the shoreline and a historic cabin on the island. 

Location

United States
24° 37' 42.5172" N, 82° 52' 23.4732" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Dan Kimball, Marcy Rockman, and Kelly Clark

Project Summary

Sea level rise and increased tropical storm intensity pose a serious risk to the long-term sustainability of historic Fort Jefferson at Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida. The park is trying to mitigate these effects over time through strategic planning, informed decision making, and responsible investments that consider historical integrity and long-term sustainability of the fort and island on which it was built. 

Location

United States
67° 7' 41.0016" N, 163° 44' 43.0008" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Dael Devenport, Frank Hays

Project Summary

Climate change has increased the vulnerability of cultural resources in coastal locations at Bering Land Bridge National Preserve and Cape Krusenstern National Monument along the northwestern Alaska coast. The Alaska Regional Office is developing and testing a GIS model that is intended to predict locations and vulnerability of these cultural resources. 

Location

32168 New Smyrna Beach , FL
United States
29° 1' 32.9484" N, 80° 55' 37.1928" W
Florida US
Author Name(s): 
Margo Schwadron

Project Summary

Canaveral National Seashore contains several of the largest, most intact, and most significant prehistoric shell mounds in North America. Four of these mounds are threatened by erosion induced by sea level rise and increased storm activities.

Location

TX
United States
31° 58' 6.9564" N, 99° 54' 6.5268" W
Texas US
Author Name(s): 
Jack G. Johnson, Brenda K. Todd

Project Summary

Amistad National Recreation Area, Texas, protects many archeological sites in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands region of southwest Texas. Sites are affected by lake level fluctuations related to climate change impacts including precipitation, storms, and changes in agricultural water use. Park managers are documenting the impact of changing water levels on the cultural resources in the park. 

Abstract

From relatively limited and narrow uses two decades ago, the concept of vulnerability has emerged as a key dimension of the development debate. Be it in relation to climate change, disasters, globalization and economic development, and social–ecological system changes more generally, vulnerability is a complex and multifaceted concept that has attracted the attention of scholars and development practitioners from all disciplines. The many interpretations of vulnerability and its many scales (e.g.

Abstract

A secretarial order identified climate adaptation as a critical performance objective for future management of U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) lands and resources in response to global change. Vulnerability assessments can inform climate adaptation planning by providing insight into what natural resources are most at risk and why. Three components of vulnerability—exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity—were defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as necessary for identifying climate adaptation strategies and actions.

Abstract

The U.S. Geological Survey is examining effects of future sea-level rise on the coastal landscape from Maine to Virginia by producing spatially explicit, probabilistic predictions using sea-level projections, vertical land movement rates (due to isostacy), elevation data, and land-cover data.

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